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Attitude (psychology)

Gathering tips from carers to support people with dementia: an adaptation of the TOP 5 program for community use

Aim: Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia are often managed inappropriately with antipsychotic medicines. The TOP 5 program, which involves recording up to five relevant and meaningful tips that assist in personalizing care for the person with dementia, has been tested in the hospital setting and transitions of care in Australia, and has been found to be useful. Our study aimed to adapt the TOP 5 program as a strategy to support people with dementia in a primary care setting and to test the acceptability of our adapted TOP 5 program materials.

Wed, 11/21/2018 - 16:31

Perspectives and Insights from Vietnamese American Mental Health Professionals on How to Culturally Tailor a Vietnamese Dementia Caregiving Program

Objective: Little is known about dementia and caregiving among the rapidly growing Vietnamese American population. This qualitative study elicited insights on culturally tailoring an intervention to address mental health needs in Vietnamese American dementia caregivers from Vietnamese American mental health professionals. Methods: Eight Vietnamese American mental health professionals were interviewed to explore: experiences working with and needs of the community; Vietnamese attitudes toward treatment; and acculturation in Vietnamese caregiving.

Wed, 11/21/2018 - 11:23

Does it Matter if We Disagree? The Impact of Incongruent Care Preferences on Persons with Dementia and Their Care Partners

Purpose: To gain a better understanding of how actual and perceived incongruence of care preferences affects the psychosocial well-being of persons with dementia and their family caregiver. Design and Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 128 dyads each consisting of a person with dementia and a family caregiver.

Tue, 11/20/2018 - 12:28

The development of service user-led recommendations for health and social care services on leaving hospital with memory loss or dementia - the SHARED study

Background Health and social care services are under strain providing care in the community particularly at hospital discharge. Patient and carer experiences can inform and shape services. Objective To develop service user-led recommendations enabling smooth transition for people living with memory loss from acute hospital to community.

Wed, 10/31/2018 - 15:25

Challenges in supporting lay carers of patients at the end of life: results from focus group discussions with primary healthcare providers

Background: Family caregivers (FCGs) of patients at the end of life (EoL) cared for at home receive support from professional and non-professional care providers. Healthcare providers in general practice play an important role as they coordinate care and establish contacts between the parties concerned. To identify potential intervention targets, this study deals with the challenges healthcare providers in general practice face in EoL care situations including patients, caregivers and networks.

Wed, 10/24/2018 - 09:27

Developing a complex intervention programme for informal caregivers of stroke survivors: The Caregivers' Guide

Background Stroke affects the entire family system. Failure to meet the needs of caregivers leads to physical and mental overburdening. Stroke caregivers may benefit from professional support. The literature reviews have shown that there is still no clarity concerning the most appropriate set-up of a support programme. In Germany, there is no stroke caregiver support programme that operates throughout the course of rehabilitation. Aim The aim was to develop a complex intervention programme for stroke caregivers in North-Rhine Westphalia, Germany.

Wed, 10/24/2018 - 09:12

Caregiver Perspectives About Using Antipsychotics and Other Medications for Symptoms of Dementia

Background and Objectives: To avoid "chemical restraints," policies and guidelines have been implemented to curb the use of medications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Antipsychotics have been particularly targeted because of their rare severe side effects. Consequently, caregiver directed non-pharmacologic therapies have increased while medication use for BPSD has diminished. Despite such initiatives, however, antipsychotics continue to be prescribed "off-label" for roughly 20% of nursing home patients.

Mon, 10/22/2018 - 14:59

Evaluation of a West Australian residential mental health respite service

Family members continue to be the predominant providers of support, care and accommodation for loved ones with mental health issues, and empirical studies suggest that accessing mental health respite can be helpful for both carers and consumers. However, the availability of, and access to, this respite in Australia is far from optimal. Major issues have also been identified such as low utilisation, the inappropriate and inflexible nature of services and the inability of services to respond to situations where multiple needs exist.

Tue, 10/16/2018 - 14:05

Barriers to increasing the physical activity of people with intellectual disabilities

Background: The prevalence of obesity, inactivity and related morbidity and mortality is higher amongst people with intellectual disabilities than in the population in general, an issue of global concern. This research examined the perspectives of people with intellectual disabilities and their carers, on exercise and activity. Materials and Methods: Qualitative data were collected via interviews and a focus group with people with intellectual disabilities and their paid and family carers, recruited via state-funded community-based day centres in Scotland.

Mon, 09/10/2018 - 12:01

Where are we now? Twenty-five years of research, policy and practice on young carers

It is more than 25 years since the critical dialogue on young carers was played out in the pages of this journal (see Morris and Keith, 1995; Aldridge and Becker, 1996). Since that time, research evidence has given us a clearer picture of the extent of young caring in the UK and its consequences for children and families, including two new national studies that focus on the prevalence and impact of young caring in England.

Thu, 08/23/2018 - 15:01

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