Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - Care of people

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Care of people

Care of people

Incentivizing the care of adult family members through a two-part tax credit

In the United States, nearly thirty-four million individuals provide informal care for their adult family members each year. Adult care recipients experience positive emotional and health-related outcomes when cared for by relatives, but this responsibility also places significant stress on caregivers. The government should subsidize and encourage family adult care, not only because of these social impacts, but also because this care can reduce healthcare costs.

Fri, 01/24/2020 - 12:03

The impact of extended half-life versus conventional factor product on hemophilia caregiver burden

Introduction: Extended half-life factor products have reduced annualized bleeding rates in hemophilia patients. The impact of extended half-life versus conventional factor products on hemophilia caregiver burden has not been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate caregiver burden in extended half-life versus conventional factor products for hemophilia A and B. Methods: This cross-sectional web-based study of caregivers of people with hemophilia A or B was recruited from a panel research company and by word of mouth.

Tue, 11/20/2018 - 11:35

The occurrence and persistence of thoughts of suicide, self-harm and death in family caregivers of people with dementia: a longitudinal data analysis over 2 years

Objective: Family caregivers of people with dementia often report high levels of stress and depression, but little is known about those who contemplate suicide or self-harm. This study explores thoughts of suicide, self-harm and death in dementia caregivers and investigates the characteristics that distinguish them from those without such thoughts.  Methods: Data were collected every 3 months, for 24 months, from 192 family caregivers of people with dementia living in the Netherlands.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 14:21

Towards a culturally acceptable end-of-life survey questionnaire: a Bengali translation of VOICES

Aim To assess the cultural acceptability and appropriateness of an English end-of-life survey questionnaire translated into Bengali for use in east London.

Study design Group discussions with informal carers (n=3 groups) and professionals (n=1 group).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

The long-term consequences of partnership dissolution for support in later life in the United Kingdom

There has long been an interest in the United Kingdom about whether and how changes in family life affect support for older people, but nevertheless the consequences of partnership dissolution for late-life support have been little researched. Using data from the British Household Panel Study (1991–2003), this study investigated the longitudinal association between partnership dissolution and two types of support for 1,966 people aged 70 or more years: (i) informal support from children in the form of contacts and help (e.g.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Caring for Carers: Recognising, Valuing and Supporting the Caring Role

The article focuses on a strategy meant for providing support for carers across Northern Ireland. The strategy quotes census figures indicating that there are more than 185,000 unpaid carers in Northern Ireland, equating to about 11 percent of the population. Carers need some help and support to enable them to continue in their caring role. The strategy include the identification of those acting in a caring role, information for carers, support services, the special needs of young carers and training and employment.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Confronting the care penalty: the case for extending reasonable adjustment rights along the disability/care continuum

Informal caring for adults with disabilities is a source of unacceptable disadvantage in employment, finances, social inclusion, and health; here termed the ‘care penalty’. This penalty can be appropriately tackled through equality law, making care a ground for unlawful discrimination. Carers are not adequately protected from indirectly discriminatory disadvantages by other grounds such as sex and disability. Nor are carers adequately protected by carer-specific provisions such as the UK right to request flexible working.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Chapter 2: THE SUPPORT OF CARERS AND THEIR ORGANIZATIONS IN SOME NORTHERN AND WESTERN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

Chapter 2 of the book "Key Policy Issues in Long-Term Care" is presented. It explores the support of carers and the carers' organizations in certain countries in northern and western Europe. It looks into the carers' support that is given in the said countries and views the development of the new policy initiatives carers in the Netherlands. It is stated that carers' organization plays an important role in the formation of carers' policy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

The Simon Heng column

Presents views on social care among children. Overview of a 2005 report by The Education Network about young carers; Decision to be a good parent upon the acquisition of a disability; Reasons why parents should impose responsibilities on their children when they risk damaging their futures.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Keeping carers healthy: the role of community nurses and colleagues

Carers form a substantial proportion of the patients seen by primary care professionals, but their health needs are often overlooked. By recognizing and addressing the needs of the carer as well as the patient, primary care staff (including practice, community and district nurses) can protect the physical and mental health of both. Staff can start by developing simple systems for identifying and recording both patients who are carers, and patients who have carers. Primary health professionals may be able to identify specific opportunities for checking on carers’ health, e.g.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Page 1 of 3