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Communication and interaction within dementia care triads: developing a theory for relationship-centred care

This article develops an approach towards dementia care that highlights the nature of dementia care triads comprising the person with dementia, their informal carer, and the health and social professional. In particular, the article highlights various social practices that are shown, from our practice, to contribute towards the inclusion or exclusion of particular triad members. The article reviews existing work on triadic interaction, particularly in relationship to dementia care. Various communication processes are identified and illustrated using examples taken from casework.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Preference for place of death in Germany

Background: Dying in the preferred place is considered a key requirement for a “good death.” The aims of our study were to explore preferred places of death of deceased people and their bereaved relatives in Rhineland-Palatinate (Germany). We further wanted to assess the congruence between preferred and actual place of death.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Support for carers of people with dementia during hospital admission

The aim of this study was to help develop support services for carers of people with dementia on admission to a district general hospital. Qualitative methodology was used in the form of individual semi-structured interviews. These interviews suggest that service developments need to take into account the individual need of each carer. Identified themes included communication, vulnerability of the carers and the need to develop a therapeutic relationship with the carer as well as the person with dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

A sociological focus on 'expert patients'

The increase of chronic illness as a leading cause of death has given rise to self-care and expert patient initiatives. Caring for chronically ill people places a tremendous economic burden on the health care system, informal carers, the labour market and benefit system (Department of Health 2001, 2004, 2005). Thus, in many countries health policy encourages patients to become ‘experts’ in the self-management of their conditions in the belief that it will help save money and improve health and well-being (Wanless 2002).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Dementia care in the domiciliary setting

This video focuses on developing dementia care skills. Designed to reflect the intricacies of providing care in the home, this title explores the ways in which domiciliary care workers can adapt everyday routines and practices to support a person with dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

What do informal carers need from district nursing services? (Cover story)

More than 5 million informal carers provide support to individuals who wish to remain within their own homes. The role of informal carers in maintaining people within their own homes has been identified as crucial. This article considers the assessment of need of informal carers in the primary care setting, placing particular emphasis on the role of the district nurse as an advocate for informal carers when working with other health and social care service providers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

The carer's place in the cancer situation: where does the carer stand in the medical setting?

Recent thinking about policy on cancer services in the UK has highlighted the importance of recognising the needs of carers, but is unclear about the ways in which this might be done. Our recent study on the psychosocial needs of cancer patients and their main informal carers was unusual in its combined focus on patients and carers experiencing the ‘cancer journey’ together. One of our aims was to contribute to an understanding of what it means to be the main carer of someone with cancer.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Meeting in the middle: improving communication in primary health care consultations with people with an intellectual disability

The increased presence and participation in Australian society of people with an intellectual disability provides challenges for the provision of primary health care. General practitioners (GPs) identify themselves as ill equipped to provide for this heterogeneous population. A major obstacle to the provision of appropriate health care is seen as inadequate communication between the GP and the person with an intellectual disability, who may or may not be accompanied by a carer or advocate.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

An intergroup communication approach to understanding the function of compliance, outgroup typicality, and honest explanations in distant caregiving relationships : validation of a health-care communication scale

This study examines distant caregiving relationships to achieve a better understanding of the function of compliance, outgroup typicality, and honest explanations from an intergroup communication perspective. With more families living at a distance due to our increasingly mobile society, long-distance caregiving (LDC) is a unique and growing caregiving situation that caregivers must face. LDC differs for caregivers and patients in close geographic proximity due to lack of availability, lack of intimate understanding of the caregiving needs at hand, and unknown financial burdens.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Do patients really want copies of their GP letters? A questionnaire survey of older adults and their carers

AIMS AND METHOD The National Health Service Plan stated that all correspondence between clinicians would be copied to patients by April 2004. We wanted to find out whether this practice reflected the true desires of their patients. A questionnaire survey was therefore performed in older adults and their carers attending a psychiatric out-patient clinic.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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