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Evaluation

Assessing the outcomes of equipment and adaptations: issues and approaches

Current government policy emphasises professional accountability, Best Value, evidence-based practice and outcomes for users and carers. In this context, being able to demonstrate the effectiveness of routine practice is increasingly important. This article considers the key issues in collecting information about the outcomes of equipment and adaptations. These include: the assessment of the full range of outcomes; the timing of data collection; the use of standardised and individualised measures; and linking outcomes to interventions.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Care coordination assisted by technology for multiethnic caregivers of persons with dementia : a pilot clinical demonstration project on caregiver burden and depression

We evaluated a care-coordination project assisted by a screen-phone to support and educate caregivers. A total of 113 caregivers of home-dwelling veterans with dementia were recruited to the study: 72 were white, 32 were African American and nine were Hispanic. Caregivers were assessed for burden, depression, coping, quality of life, knowledge and satisfaction. None of the outcome measures changed significantly after twelve months. Forty care-recipient and caregiver dyads responded to the twelve-month telephone satisfaction survey.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Caring attitudes

Up to one and a half million people in Britain are involved in caring for a relative or friend with mental illness or dementia. Recent government policy has emphasised the needs of this particular group of carers, but effective support can be implemented only if managers and practitioners know what works.

Looks at the findings from a review of mental health carer support and the effectiveness of the services on offer. The review was carried out by the Social Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at the University of York.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Befriending carers of people with dementia: randomised controlled trial

Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a voluntary sector based befriending scheme in improving psychological wellbeing and quality of life for family carers of people with dementia. Design Single blind randomised controlled trial. Setting Community settings in East Anglia and London. Participants 236 family carers of people with primary progressive dementia. Intervention Contact with a befriender facilitator and offer of match with a trained lay volunteer befriender compared with no befriender facilita

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Charting carer satisfaction: the hospital experience

Reports on an evaluation of the efforts of the Royal United Hospital (RUH) Bath to improve the support offered to people with dementia and their family carers. The intervention included the recruitment of three part-time dementia coordinators, a seven-day older adult mental health liaison service with nurses and a psychiatrist, additional staff training and an increased emphasis on arts and music in the wards.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Improving health and social care support for carers from black and minority ethnic communities

This briefing paper draws attention to the experience of black and minority ethnic carers in the context of mainstream service provision and recent policy developments such as the National Carers Strategies, service user and carer involvement and the personalisation agenda. It acknowledges that marginalisation is often a consequence of lack of support for both carers and black and minority ethnic communities in health and social care. The paper highlights the diversity of carers from these ethnic backgrounds and the multifaceted impact of discrimination.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Does every child really matter?

The title of the new children's green paper "Every Child Matters" implies inclusiveness, and the paper does indeed highlight a range of client groups with specific needs, suggesting that all children are covered. Asks whether the commitment to inclusiveness is genuine or merely a token gesture. Looks at 5 areas where more could have been done: children entering the country, parents and carers of disabled children, young carers, children with parents in jail, and improving fostering and adoption services. (Quotes from original text)

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

The relative importance of factors affecting the choice of bathing devices

There is only a small evidence base to draw upon when choosing assistive devices. Evaluations such as those funded by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency,* Department of Health, United Kingdom, generate data from which evidence-based guidelines can be compiled, but it is often difficult to determine the relative importance of the various factors involved.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Sustained informal care: the feasibility, construct validity and test–retest reliability of the CarerQol-instrument to measure the impact of informal care in long-term care

This study investigated the feasibility, validity and reliability of the Carer Quality of Life (CarerQol) instrument among informal carers of long-term care users. CarerQol-VAS measured the impact of informal care by assessing happiness, and CarerQol-7D described burden dimensions. Participants included 100 informal carers of patients obtaining day care or living in a long-term care facility in the Netherlands. Construct validity assessed the extent to which differences in background characteristics were reflected in happiness scores with univariate and multivariate statistics.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16