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Experiences and perspectives of the parents of emerging adults living with type 1 diabetes

Introduction Whereas it is widely recognized that emerging adulthood can be a difficult time in the life of an individual living with type 1 diabetes, relatively little is known about the experiences of their parents or guardians. These individuals once shouldered much of the burden for their child's diabetes 'self'-management, yet their contribution is often overlooked by the adult healthcare system. Here, we set out to gain an understanding of the perspectives of parents of emerging adults living with type 1 diabetes.

Sun, 11/29/2020 - 12:44

Caring for a spouse with advanced cancer: similarities and differences for male and female caregivers

Most caregiving literature has focused on women, who have traditionally taken on caregiving roles. However, more research is needed to clarify the mixed evidence regarding the impact of gender on caregiver/patient psychological outcomes, especially in an advanced cancer context. In this paper, we examine gender differences in caregiver stress, burden, anxiety, depression, and coping styles, as well as how caregiver gender impacts patient outcomes in the context of advanced cancer. Eighty-eight patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers completed psychosocial surveys.

Mon, 11/23/2020 - 13:58

Burden on Caregivers of Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions: Intersectionality of Age, Gender, Education level, Employment Status, and Impact on Social Life

Intersectionality analysis is the study of overlapping or intersecting social identities. Intersecting social identities may have an impact on the perception of burden by family caregivers of older persons with multiple chronic conditions (MCC). The purpose of this study was to explore the interaction of social factors on the burden of caring for older adults with MCC. A total of 194 caregivers of older adults with MCC were recruited from Alberta and Ontario. Survey data were collected at two time points, six months apart.

Mon, 11/23/2020 - 11:28

Traditional Gender Roles and Effects of Dementia Caregiving within a South Asian Ethnic Group in England

Background: Despite the integral role that women play in the care of older adults in South Asian families, limited empirical data are available on the impact of migration from South Asia to England. The purpose of this research was to examine caring for a family member with dementia from a gender role perspective. Methods: Data were gathered in two phases: (1) focus groups and (2) semi-structured interviews. Focus groups were held with the general public, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with family carers.

Tue, 07/28/2020 - 12:24

The Moral Resilience of Young People Who Care

This paper draws on findings from a qualitative study of the social wellbeing of young people caring for a close family member. The research makes a novel contribution to the international literature by examining the moral resilience of young adult carers. Focus groups or individual, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with fifteen young people in South-East England during 2018?2019. The paper explores whether young people with a seriously ill or disabled family member define and conduct themselves in moral terms and how they respond to the moral challenges of a caring life.

Wed, 06/10/2020 - 13:48

A Scoping Review of Literature on Sex and Gender Differences Among Dementia Spousal Caregivers

Background and Objectives Sex and gender differences among dementia spousal caregivers have been investigated, but never systematically reviewed or synthesized. A synthesis of findings can help facilitate specificity in practice and in health policy development. As a first step towards such a synthesis, this scoping review reports the available evidence, identifies research gaps, and suggests possible directions for future research. Research Design and Methods A scoping review methodology was used to identify articles, and to chart and analyze data.

Mon, 02/03/2020 - 10:56

Differences within Differences: Gender Inequalities in Caregiving Intensity Vary by Race and Ethnicity in Informal Caregivers

Among the 50+ million informal caregivers in the US, substantial gender, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in caregiving intensity are well-documented. However, those disparities may be more nuanced: gender disparities in caregiving intensity may vary by race/ethnicity (White, Black, and Hispanic) and socioeconomic status (SES).

Wed, 01/22/2020 - 16:30

Determinants of Burden and Satisfaction in Informal Caregivers: Two Sides of the Same Coin? The CUIDAR-SE Study

The aim of this study conducted in Spain was to analyze and compare burden, severe burden, and satisfaction among informal caregivers in relation to health-related quality of life (HRQoL), type and duration of caregiving, perceived social support, and use of social and health care services. We performed multivariate analyses to identify variables associated with caregiver burden, severe burden, and satisfaction with caregiving, stratified by gender.

Wed, 01/22/2020 - 15:50

77 Behind the Scenes: the Burden Experienced by Informal Carers of People with Dementia

Background Informal care is undoubtedly a vital to dementia care in Ireland. To date, little research has been carried out exploring the burden experienced by informal carers of people with mild to moderate dementia. The main aim of this quantitative study is to explore the burden experienced by caregivers, relative to dementia severity. The secondary aim is to identify risk factors which may be contributing to this perceived burden.

Wed, 12/18/2019 - 14:43

59 Male Family Carers' Perceptions of Formal Support Services, a Meta-ethnography

Background Family carers provide thousands of hours of unpaid work every year, a third of whom are men, however this group are generally under-represented in research. Comparative studies have shown that male carers experience their caring role differently to female counterparts. Social concepts related to masculinity can help to explain help-seeking behaviours of male carers, as well as their attitudes to accessing outside support. Compared to women carers, men have lower rates of uptake of formal support services.

Wed, 12/18/2019 - 12:59

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