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Gender

Determinants of Burden and Satisfaction in Informal Caregivers: Two Sides of the Same Coin? The CUIDAR-SE Study

The aim of this study conducted in Spain was to analyze and compare burden, severe burden, and satisfaction among informal caregivers in relation to health-related quality of life (HRQoL), type and duration of caregiving, perceived social support, and use of social and health care services. We performed multivariate analyses to identify variables associated with caregiver burden, severe burden, and satisfaction with caregiving, stratified by gender.

Wed, 01/22/2020 - 15:50

77 Behind the Scenes: the Burden Experienced by Informal Carers of People with Dementia

Background Informal care is undoubtedly a vital to dementia care in Ireland. To date, little research has been carried out exploring the burden experienced by informal carers of people with mild to moderate dementia. The main aim of this quantitative study is to explore the burden experienced by caregivers, relative to dementia severity. The secondary aim is to identify risk factors which may be contributing to this perceived burden.

Wed, 12/18/2019 - 14:43

59 Male Family Carers' Perceptions of Formal Support Services, a Meta-ethnography

Background Family carers provide thousands of hours of unpaid work every year, a third of whom are men, however this group are generally under-represented in research. Comparative studies have shown that male carers experience their caring role differently to female counterparts. Social concepts related to masculinity can help to explain help-seeking behaviours of male carers, as well as their attitudes to accessing outside support. Compared to women carers, men have lower rates of uptake of formal support services.

Wed, 12/18/2019 - 12:59

Caregiving time costs and trade-offs: Gender differences in Sweden, the UK, and Canada

Population ageing is putting pressure on pension systems and health care services, creating an imperative to extend working lives. At the same time, policy makers throughout Europe and North America are trying to expand the use of home care over institutional services. Thus, the number of people combining caregiving responsibilities with paid work is growing. We investigate the conflicts that arise from this by exploring the time costs of unpaid care and how caregiving time is traded off against time in paid work and leisure in three distinct policy contexts.

Wed, 12/18/2019 - 11:08

An asymmetric burden: Experiences of men and women as caregivers of people with psycho-social disabilities in rural North India

Caring for a family member with a psycho-social disability can be both rewarding and burdensome. This study analyses the experiences of caregivers of people with psychosocial disabilities (PPSDs) in rural communities in North India using relational gender theory. In-depth interviews with 18 female and male caregivers of PPSDs probed the social, emotional and health impacts of their caregiving role. Nine themes were identified that were grouped under three meta-themes: intra-personal, inter-personal and institutional impacts.

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 18:34

Male/Female Differences in the Impact of Caring for Elderly Relatives on Labor Market Attachment and Hours of Work: 1997-2015

Objectives: Using representative samples of the Canadian labor market (N = 5,871,850), this study examined male/female differences in the impact of informal care on labor market attachment, and the extent to which differences in labor market participation and employment relationships explained these differences over a 19-year period.

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 14:09

Predictors of Secondary Role Strains Among Spousal Caregivers of Older Adults With Functional Disability

Background and Objectives: Aging spouses commonly care for a partner with functional disability, but little is known about how spousal caregiving may impact different life domains. This study evaluated how caregiving characteristics are associated with secondary role strains among spousal caregivers. Research Design and Methods: This cross-sectional study examined 367 spousal caregivers and their partners from the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study and National Study of Caregiving.

Fri, 09/20/2019 - 12:35

Gender Differences in Longitudinal Associations Between Intimate Care, Resiliency, and Depression Among Informal Caregivers of Patients Surviving the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit

Background/Objective: Informal caregivers (e.g., family and friends) are at risk for developing depression, which can be detrimental to both caregiver and patient functioning. Initial evidence suggests that resiliency may reduce the risk of depression. However, gender differences in associations between multiple psychosocial resiliency factors and depression have not been examined among neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) caregivers.

Wed, 09/11/2019 - 09:48

Eldercare and Childcare: How Does Caregiving Responsibility Affect Job Discrimination?

Despite rising legal claims, little research has examined discrimination against job applicants or employees because of their family caregiving responsibilities. Across three studies, we examine discrimination in hiring and starting salary decisions among equally qualified job applicants based on their elder, child, or sandwiched caregiving responsibilities. In study 1, primary caregiving parents were less likely to be hired, were offered lower salaries, and were rated as less competent, committed, available, and agentic, compared to non-primary caregiving parents.

Fri, 06/07/2019 - 14:34

'Special Mothers' in Ireland: Gender, Identity and The Social Construction of Caring for a Relative With an Intellectual Disability

Gender balance in caring is heavily skewed towards women providing the majority of care. This is particularly evident in literature relating to intellectual disability. Using the platforms of mothering and disability to examine the literature, this article sheds light on the cultural norms and societal discourses that influence 'who cares' for children and adults with disabilities. It highlights that 'who cares' is often a socially constructed ideology that results in a reconstructed identity for women.

Thu, 05/23/2019 - 16:01