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Perceptions About Technologies That Help Community-Dwelling Older Adults Remain at Home: Qualitative Study

BACKGROUND: The population of Europe is aging rapidly. Most community-dwelling older adults (CDOAs) want to remain in their homes, particularly those experiencing functional decline. Politicians and academics repeatedly praise technological instruments for being the preferred solution for helping older adults with deteriorating health to remain at home. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to understand the perceptions of CDOAs and their informal caregivers (ICs) and professional caregivers (PCs) about technologies that can help keep older adults at home.

Wed, 08/12/2020 - 13:29

Understanding family caregivers' needs to support relatives with advanced progressive disease at home: An ethnographic study in rural Portugal

Background: Family caregivers play an important role supporting their relatives with advanced progressive disease to live at home. There is limited research to understand family caregiver needs over time, particularly outside of high-income settings. The aim of this study was to explore family caregivers' experiences of caring for a relative living with advanced progressive disease at home, and their perceptions of met and unmet care needs over time. Methods: An ethnographic study comprising observations and interviews.

Tue, 08/11/2020 - 12:49

I becomes we, but where is me? The unity-division paradox when caring for a relative with dementia: A qualitative study

Background: The number of older people living with dementia is increasing.

Fri, 01/24/2020 - 11:17

The care crisis in Spain: an analysis of the family care situation in mental health from a professional psychosocial perspective

The aim of this article is to investigate the importance of family care in mental health and identify the shortcomings of the Spanish model of health care for the mentally ill. The empirical process comprised three qualitative procedures involving 37 experts from different regions of Spain. In order to guarantee the rigor of the data, a social worker discussion group was set up to create an interview script. Interviews were then carried out with 22 professionals who take care of people with mental illness in various public facilities throughout the country.

Mon, 01/13/2020 - 15:37

Dementia Family Caregivers' Willingness to Pay for an In-home Program to Reduce Behavioral Symptoms and Caregiver Stress

Objectives: Our objective was to determine whether family caregivers of people with dementia (PwD) are willing to pay for an in-home intervention that provides strategies to manage behavioral symptoms and caregiver stress and to identify predictors of willingness-to-pay (WTP).; Methods: During baseline interviews of a randomized trial and before treatment assignment, caregivers were asked how much they were willing to pay per session for an eight-session program over 3 months.

Wed, 06/19/2019 - 09:55

Are We Ready for the CARE Act? Family Caregiving Education for Health Care Providers

The CARE Act, law in 40 states and territories in the United States, requires hospitals to identify and include family caregivers during admission and in preparation for discharge. Although the number of family caregivers has been steadily increasing, health care providers are ill-prepared to address their needs, and caregiving remains a neglected topic in health care providers' education. A market analysis was performed to explore the availability of and interest in interprofessional courses and programs focused on preparing health professionals to support family caregivers.

Mon, 06/10/2019 - 11:19

Qualitative Analysis of Faith Community Nurse–Led Cognitive-Behavioral and Spiritual Counseling for Dementia Caregivers

This article presents themes emerging from semistructured interviews with dementia family caregivers in rural communities who participated in an integrative, cognitive-behavioral and spiritual counseling intervention, and with faith community nurses (FCNs) who delivered the intervention. The primary objectives of the counseling intervention were to ameliorate dementia caregivers’ depressive affect and the severity of their self-identified caregiving and self-care problems.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 15:13

Striving for balance between caring and restraint: young adults' experiences with parental multiple sclerosis

Aims and objectives To explore and describe how young adults between 18-25 years of age experienced growing up with a parent with multiple sclerosis and how these experiences continue to influence their daily lives. Background Chronic parental illness is occurring in about 10% of families worldwide, but little is known about how the children experience growing up with a parent with multiple sclerosis during their childhood and into young adulthood. Design We chose a qualitative design using a phenomenological approach based on Giorgi.

Thu, 03/28/2019 - 12:41

Spinal cord injury and long-term carers: Perceptions of formal and informal support

The grounded theory study from which this paper is drawn explored the experiences of partners and other long-term family carers living with, and supporting, a person with a spinal cord injury over long periods of time. Eleven (11) female carers with between eight and 33 years of living with, and supporting, a family member with a spinal cord injury were purposively recruited to the study. The study identified a number of key issues for long-term carers in this context.

Wed, 07/04/2018 - 16:50

Worries and problems of young carers: issues for mental health

This paper reports on a research study which explored the worries and problems of young carers in Edinburgh. Sixty-one young carers took part in the study, conducted between April and June 2002. Findings indicate that young carers identify significant worries and problems in relation to their well-being, and that these come over and above any 'normal' adolescent difficulties. It is suggested that these findings may have important implications for young carers' mental health, now and in the future, and contain important lessons for child and family social work in general.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

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