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Parent-child relations

Consequences of caring for a child with a chronic disease: Employment and leisure time of parents

Chronically ill children require several hours of additional care per day compared to healthy children. As parents provide most of this care, they have to incorporate it into their daily schedule, which implies a reduction in time for other activities. The study aimed to assess the effect of having a chronically ill child on parental employment and parental leisure activity time, and to explore the role of demographic, social, and disease-related variables in relation to employment and leisure activities.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Quality of relationships between care recipients and their primary caregivers and its effect on caregivers' burden and satisfaction in Israel

Research on the impact of quality of relationships between primary caregivers and their care recipients on burden and satisfaction with caregiving is still rare. The sample included 335 dyads of primary caregivers and care recipients who were cognitively intact. Face-to-face interviews were conducted at the respondents' homes using structured questionnaires. No significant correlation between caregiving burden and caregiving satisfaction was found.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

We didn't know they cared

Young carers may be more damaged by what we do to try to protect them.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Young carers of parents with mental health issues

In 2009, The Social Care Institute for Excellence introduced guidelines for practitioners to support families in which parents have mental health problems. Here, Scie presents a case study demonstrating how the guidance could be successfully applied

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Young carers as social actors: coping strategies of children caring for ailing or ageing guardians in Western Kenya

There is a vast body of research on the impact of HIV/AIDS on children, but little which acknowledges the role of children in providing care and support for ailing parents or ageing guardians. There has been a tendency to downplay the active role and agency of young carers, with young carers often represented as victims of damaging circumstances that compromise their psychosocial well-being.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Communication skills: forming and maintaining relationships with service users, carers, professionals and others

This resource looks at the benefits that are gained from the relationships that are built within social work. Using the voices of service users, carers and workers you will hear accounts of how the relationships that were created helped them to deal with the difficulties they faced.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

How to support young carers

Each week the Social Care Institute for Excellence puts forward research findings in a specific field

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

The changing nature of family relationships in middle and later life: parent-caring and the mid-life developmental opportunity

Demographic trends have created a situation in which relationships between family members endure over long periods of time, sometimes in ways that are as yet undefined by psychological theories. Clinical social workers are called upon to help these families. This paper examines how these relationships are affected in middle-class families when elders become frail and need care, and families become “stuck.” Current literature about adult and later life development as well as clinical examples will be cited to illuminate this discussion.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Constructing 'normal childhoods': young people talk about young carers

There has been a great deal of attention paid to young carers in recent research, social policy and service provision. In this paper we report on a survey and interview study of 46 young people aged 15 to 18, nine of whom had experience as young carers, to explore the ways in which young people construct the young carer and their disabled parent. A key theme arising from the interview data analysis is the construction of a series of normative assumptions about 'normal' childhood through which young carers and their disabled parent are viewed as non-normative and deficient.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Paying the piper and calling the tune? The relationship between parents and direct payments for people with intellectual disabilities

Background  The aim of this paper is to investigate the role parents are playing in direct payments provision for their son or daughter with intellectual disabilities.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09