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People with disabilities -- care

'Just being selfish for my own sake . . .': balancing the views of young adults with intellectual disabilities and their carers in transition planning

In contrast to other forms of family caregiving, becoming the parent or carer of a child with an intellectual disability (ID) implies an ongoing responsibility beyond the attainment of chronological adulthood (Meyers et al., 1985; Todd and Shearn, 1996). At the same time, a discourse of self-determination pervades policy around transition to adult services in ID in England (Valuing People, 2001). In this paper we present a subset of data from a project which aimed to examine how the process of transition from child to adult services in ID is managed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Let relatives have a bigger role in care

Royal college of psychiatrists, leeds, 28 february

Learning disability practitioners should drop any barriers that stop relatives from contributing to the care being delivered to older service users, according to Andrew Fairburn, the medical director of Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Trust.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Young Carers: Children Caring for Family Members Living with an Illness or Disability

Young people often demonstrate considerable commitment, resilience and skill within their roles as young carers. Their contributions, however are regularly devalued or unrecognized by the systems that seek to support them. In this article we examine existing knowledge on why and how young people become young carers and the influences such a role can have on them. We also look at policy and practice issues related to young carers. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Needs of carers of severely disabled people: are they identified and met adequately?

Objective: To examine the unmet needs of informal carers of community dwelling disabled people and to compare their perspectives to those of disabled people and nominated professionals. It was hypothesised that a poor recognition of carers’ needs could have implications for carers’ well- being and thus their ability to maintain their caring role. Need was defined as a service or a resource that would confer a health or rehabilitation gain.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13