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Residential care

Barriers to non-residential respite care for adults with moderate to complex needs: a UK perspective

Respite aims to alleviate the stress and burden of caring for someone with an intellectual disability and/or autism. Respite can take place in a number of different ways, but most commonly occurs in a residential setting. Based on survey and interview data with carers (CAs), service users and stakeholders (STs) in a northern city in England, this article explores some of the perceived or actual barriers to availing ‘non-residential’ respite. A number of barriers to non-residential respite are identified.

Fri, 04/12/2019 - 15:32

Effects of respite care training on respite provider knowledge and confidence, and outcomes for family caregivers receiving respite services

Respite services are vital in supporting informal caregivers in need of a break from their caregiving duties. A respite training program aimed at developing respite provider competence and improving caregiver well-being was evaluated. Trainees experienced significant growth in their perceived respite knowledge and confidence to deliver respite from pretraining to posttraining. An objective core competency assessment confirmed posttraining knowledge in 10 core areas of respite.

Thu, 08/23/2018 - 14:05

A journey without maps—Understanding the costs of caring for dependent older people in Nigeria, China, Mexico and Peru

Purpose of the study: Populations in Latin America, Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are rapidly ageing. The extent to which traditional systems of family support and security can manage the care of increased numbers of older people with chronic health problems is unclear. Our aim was to explore the social and economic effects of caring for an older dependent person, including insight into pathways to economic vulnerability.

Mon, 08/20/2018 - 16:20

Factors affecting the decision to place a relative with dementia into residential care

AIM: To find out the reasons why carers might decide that they could not continue caring for a relative with dementia at home. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews with carers of relatives who have dementia, before placing their relatives into residential care and then again four months after that placement. N=4. RESULTS: Wandering, aggression, incontinence and physical dependency in people who have dementia are factors that might lead carers to consider placing their relatives into residential care; stress associated with Christmas can be another influencing factor.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Continuing to pay : the consequences for family caregivers of an older person's admission to a care home

This paper aims to discuss the reasons why caregiving in the community had ended for a sample of dependent older people, two-thirds of whom had dementia. Comparisons are made between the situation of a spouse caring for a partner and a daughter or son caring for a parent in a separate household. Spouses in the study had often sustained a greater burden before caregiving collapsed than had daughters or sons. They were less likely, however, to have had support from the home care service.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Family care-givers: the role of the healthcare assistant

This second article on family care-givers will focus on how healthcare assistants (HCAs) can support such care-givers within a variety of care settings, including GP practices, healthcare centres, hospital departments, hospital wards and in the care-giver's own home. Suggestions for training of HCAs who are likely to work with family care-givers will be proposed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Care: personal lives and social policy

Care: Personal Lives and Social Policy considers how normative assumptions about the meanings, practices and relationships of care are embedded in our everyday lives. It explores the ways in which these shape our sense of self and the nature of our relations with others. At the same time the book examines how social policy and welfare practices construct these relations and give or deny them meaning and validity. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Determinants of the probability of obtaining formal and informal long-term care in European countries

The aim of this report is to identify patterns in the utilisation of formal and informal long-term care (LTC) across European countries and discuss possible determinants of demand for different types of care. It addresses specific research questions on the volume of different types of care and the conditions under which care is provided. The latter include demographic factors, especially population ageing, health status and the limitations caused by poor health, family settings and social networking.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Growing older with learning disabilities: the GOLD programme

This paper provides an overview of the GOLD programme at the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities. It describes the work of the 13 funded projects in a context of wider research concerning ageing and learning disabilities. Particular attention is given to those people living with older family carers and those living in residential services for older people. The picture is of services that offer little confidence for the future, as people with learning disabilities grow older.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

The use of long-term care services by the Dutch elderly

The main focus of this paper is the development of an appropriate framework to characterize the process of long-term care utilization by the Dutch elderly. Three broad categories of care services are considered, namely, informal care, formal care at home, and institutional care. The use of these care alternatives is modelled jointly, and stochastic dependence is allowed between the various care options. Special attention is given to the concept of health status and to the potential endogeneity of this variable in the model.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

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