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Informal Caregiving and Social Capital: A Social Network Perspective

A large literature emphasizes the importance of social relationships during the caregiving process. Yet these issues are seldom presented in a social network framework that examines the structure of caregivers' personal networks. In this study, I examine how older caregivers experience changes in personal network structure. Using two waves from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, I investigate whether caregivers are more or less likely to exhibit bridging or bonding capital potential compared to noncaregivers.

Fri, 12/11/2020 - 11:48

Family carers' involvement strategies in response to sub-optimal health services to older adults living with dementia - a qualitative study

Background: While dementia policy strategies emphasize the importance of partnerships between families and formal carers to provide tailored care and effectively allocate community resources, family carers often feel left out or excluded. Poor communication has been identified as one reason for the lack of good partnerships. Few studies have investigated how family carers seek to involve themselves when they experience sub-optimal services, and how their strategies may depend on different considerations and personal abilities.

Mon, 11/30/2020 - 18:41

Changing Shapes of Care: Expressions of Filial Piety among Second-generation Chinese in the Netherlands

This study explored perceptions of filial care among second-generation Chinese immigrants in the Netherlands. The provision of filial help or care can be regarded as a cultural phenomenon known as filial piety and it can be considered within the broad scope of caregiving as "family care". Fifteen interviews were conducted, and a thematic analysis was applied. The findings showed that care was given in the form of language brokering, information inquiry, home visits, and facilitative and social support.

Mon, 11/23/2020 - 14:47

"It's More than Just Needing money": The Value of Supporting Networks of Care

It is well established in research, practice, and policy that unpaid caregivers (family and friends of people with care needs) experience stress in their role. Supports that have been put in place by policy planners and program developers to support caregivers may not be accessed by caregivers at all or may do little to reduce their stress. Accessing personal resources (education, finances), in addition to social resources (individual connections) and societal resources (community supports) are critical in fostering resilience in caregivers (helping them adapt to stress and adversity).

Fri, 01/24/2020 - 13:16

Developing compassionate communities in Australia through collective caregiving: a qualitative study exploring network-centred care and the role of the end of life sector

Background: The new public health palliative care movement calls for a move away from an individualised model of caregiving to a whole of community approach which will increase expectations on community carers. In order to avoid carer isolation, exploitation and potential burnout there is then a very real need to understand environments and relationships which support collective community caregiving.

Fri, 02/01/2019 - 12:33

Caring for Caregivers: Establishing Resilience through Social Capital

Introduction: Even with international consensus that carers play a crucial role in supporting highneeds populations and contribute to formal health system sustainability, the academic and policy literature offers inconclusive evidence to guide how to support carers to ensure their resilience. Theory and Methods: This research used a convergent mixed model parallel design consisting of three main research phases.

Thu, 07/05/2018 - 10:46