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  2. The informal caregiver's lived experience of being present with a patient who receives a diagnosis of dementia: A phenomenological inquiry

The informal caregiver's lived experience of being present with a patient who receives a diagnosis of dementia: A phenomenological inquiry

This article describes the lived experience of informal caregivers who accompany loved ones as the loved ones receive a diagnosis of dementia. Each of 12 informal caregivers participated in a face-to-face interview that was audiotaped and transcribed. Analysis of the interview text revealed seven constituents as central to the general structure of this experience: (a) having anticipated the diagnosis; (b) feeling relief; (c) feeling the gravitas of the words; (d) grieving the loss; (e) watching for the patient's reaction; (f) accepting the diagnosis and taking action; and (g) committing to care. Implications for healthcare providers are discussed, with an emphasis on the need to be sensitive to the experience of both patients and informal caregivers when disclosing a diagnosis of dementia.

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Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
Type of Work
Journal article
Publisher
Sage
ISBN/ISSN
1741-2684
Publication Year
2020
Issue Number
2
Journal Titles
Dementia (London, England)
Volume Number
19
Start Page
375
End Page
396