Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Current perceptions of respite care: experiences of family and informal carers of people with a learning disability

Current perceptions of respite care: experiences of family and informal carers of people with a learning disability

Access to regular, high-quality respite care has a beneficial impact on a carer’s ability to fulfil their caring role, but provision varies widely. The current study aims to report family and informal carers’ perceptions of respite care services offered to them by their local authority. A mixed method, triangulated design, yielded both quantitative and qualitative data. Members of a parent/carer federation were sent a questionnaire which included a section on ‘respite care’; 151 of 647 responded. Two focus groups were held with 15 carers who had previously completed the questionnaire. The majority of carers reported that their respite needs were not being met. Unmet needs were hampered by the lack of information regarding criteria for access to respite. Discrepancies were evident between professionals and carers on a shared definition of respite care. Carers were unsure of exactly which activities constituted respite care and for whom the service was being provided.

Access source material through DOI
Additional Titles
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities

Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
ISBN/ISSN
1744-6295, 1744-6295
Resource Database
British nursing index bni - exported on 8/7/2016
Publication Year
2009
Issue Number
4
Volume Number
13
Start Page
255-267
Language
English