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Greenwood, N.

An exploratory study of anxiety in carers of stroke survivors

Aims and objectives. To investigate anxiety in informal carers of stroke survivors in the first three months after discharge. Background. Informal carers, also called caregivers, play a vital role in supporting stroke survivors. However, caring for stroke survivors can have adverse consequences amongst carers such as burden, stress and reduced quality of life. Emotional distress is also commonly reported but anxiety has received less attention than depression. Design. Prospective, longitudinal, descriptive study. Method.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Assessing satisfaction with social care services among black and minority ethnic and white British carers of stroke survivors in England

Overall satisfaction levels with social care are usually high but lower levels have been reported among black and minority ethnic (BME) service users in England. Reasons for this are poorly understood. This qualitative study therefore explored satisfaction with services among informal carer participants from five different ethnic groups.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Managing uncertainty in life after stroke: a qualitative study of the experiences of established and new informal carers in the first 3 months after discharge

Background: Caring for stroke survivors at home can have an enormous impact on informal carers and past research has tended to focus on the negative emotional consequences of caring, with few identifying any positive outcomes. Despite an awareness that the experiences of these carers change over time, there is a dearth of qualitative studies investigating carers’ experiences over time.

Objectives: To investigate the experiences of informal carers of stroke survivors over time.

Design: Qualitative study.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Perceptions of the role of general practice and practical support measures for carers of stroke survivors: a qualitative study

Background: Informal carers frequently suffer adverse consequences from caring. General practice teams are well positioned to support them. However, what carers of stroke survivors want and expect from general practice, and the practical support measures they might like, remain largely unexplored.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

General practice based psychosocial interventions for supporting carers of people with dementia or stroke: a systematic review

Background: Particularly with ageing populations, dementia and stroke and their resultant disability are worldwide concerns. Much of the support for people with these conditions comes from unpaid carers or caregivers. The carers' role is often challenging and carers themselves may need support. General practice is often the first point of contact for people with these conditions and their carers, making it potentially an important source of support.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Informal carers of stroke survivors-factors influencing carers: a systematic review of quantitative studies

Purpose. Despite increasing evidence of adverse effects on informal carers of caring for stroke survivors, little is known about the characteristics of carers and survivors that influence carer outcomes. The purpose of this review is to summarize factors influencing outcomes in carers of stroke survivors. Methods. A systematic review of studies identified from English language medicine, nursing and psychology databases from 1996 - 2006 was carried out. Results. Thirty-nine studies were identified. Studies from Europe and the USA investigating negative carer outcomes dominated.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

New Deal for Carers or unfair deal: what is in it for informal carers of stroke survivors?

Proposals for the New Deal for Carers, launched in 2007, include improved access to information via a helpline and carer training. Using informal (unpaid, usually family) stroke carers as an example, we examine research evidence for whether these carers might benefit from the proposals. We argue that too little attention is being paid to the available research and despite some generic carer problems, carer diversity means this poorly targeted input is likely to have little impact.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Barriers to access and minority ethnic carers' satisfaction with social care services in the community: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative literature

As populations age, the numbers of carers overall and numbers of carers from minority ethnic groups in particular are rising. Evidence suggests that carers from all sections of the community and particularly carers from minority groups often fail to access care services. This may relate to barriers in accessing services and service dissatisfaction. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and summarise minority ethnic carers' perceptions of barriers to accessing community social care services and their satisfaction with these services if accessed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Barriers and facilitators for male carers in accessing formal and informal support: A systematic review

Unpaid, informal carers play a vital role in supporting people with long-term conditions. Being a carer can be challenging and carers may need support but they frequently fail to access it. Compared to research investigating the experiences of female carers, research with male carers is underdeveloped. The available evidence suggests male and female carers have many experiences in common but some research suggests that compared to females, male carers are even less likely to access services.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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