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Seddon, D.

Getting back to life after stroke: co-designing a peer-led coaching intervention to enable stroke survivors to rebuild a meaningful life after stroke

Purpose: Rebuilding one’s life after stroke is a key priority persistently identified by patients yet professionally led interventions have little impact. This co-design study constructs and tests a novel peer-led coaching intervention to improve post-stroke leisure and general social participation. Methods: This study followed the principles of co-design by actively engaging and harnessing the knowledge of stroke survivors in order to develop and test a peer-lead coaching intervention.

Mon, 08/03/2020 - 14:27

The experience of caring for older people with dementia in a rural area: using services

Reports on findings from the carer component of the Gwynedd Dementia Study. It is based on carer interviews, using quantitative and qualitative data. It describes the carers, their perceptions of their dependents' problems, the common challenges they face, their experiences of formal and informal support and, with reference to the literature, identifies implications for policy and practice. Levels of formal service inputs were low, but most of the carers appeared to receive the services they needed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Patterns of exclusion of carers for people with mental health problems - the perspectives of professionals

A major issue in research, policy and professional practice is the social exclusion of carers, in particular carers for people with mental health problems. In order to address the issue of social exclusion from the perspectives of professionals, 65 participants were interviewed. The sample included directors, managers and senior staff from the social care, health and voluntary sectors. Respondents were asked to comment at length on the social exclusion of carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

An emotive subject: insights from social, voluntary and healthcare professionals into the feelings of family carers for people with mental health problems

Caring for people with mental health problems can generate a whole range of positive and negative emotions, including fear, disbelief, guilt and chaos as well as a sense of purpose, pride and achievement. This paper explores the emotions of family carers from the perspectives of social, voluntary and healthcare professionals. Sixty-five participants were interviewed, the sample included directors, managers and senior staff from social, voluntary and healthcare organisations. Participants were encouraged to talk in detail about their understanding of the emotions of family carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Invisible children: young carers of parents with mental health problems - the perspectives of professionals

This study explored professional views about the needs of young carers of adults with mental health problems. Sixty five participants were interviewed and included professionals from the health, social care and voluntary sectors. Respondents were asked to comment on their understanding of the needs of young carers and appropriate methods or interventions to address these needs. Findings include: young carers'perceived isolation, restricted opportunities and stigma; fears involving child protection and family separation; and examples of good professional practice upon which to build.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08