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Wiley-blackwell

Patient and carer experience of blended diet via gastrostomy: a qualitative study

Background: Home enteral feeding is becoming increasingly prevalent within the UK. The use of commercial prescription formula is considered best practice; however, increasingly, patients are choosing to use blended diet via gastrostomy. There is anecdotal evidence suggesting both physical and social benefits, although there are concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of this method of feeding. The present study explores the experiences of patients who are currently using or have used this method of feeding in the past.

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 16:02

Factors associated with sleep in family caregivers of individuals with dementia

Purpose: The study aimed to identify factors related to family caregivers' sleep. Design and Methods: The study used a cross‐sectional design with objective and subjective methods to measure sleep in the home setting over a 7‐day period. Findings: Findings indicated that poor sleep quality was found in 91.7% of the caregiver participants. Depression, sleep hygiene, burden, and care‐recipients' sleep were significant predictors of various dimensions of caregivers' sleep.

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 15:36

Changes in caregiving appraisal among family caregivers of persons with dementia: A longitudinal study over 12 months

Aim: The main purpose of this study was to identify changes in both caregiver burden and positive caregiving appraisal over time, as well as factors affecting these variables. Methods: This analysis included 41 in‐home family caregivers who had completed questionnaires at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months.

Wed, 05/29/2019 - 12:41

Adaptation and resilience in families of individuals with Down syndrome living in Ireland

Accessible Summary: This study describes an Irish‐based study that examined how families of children with Down syndrome living in Ireland adapt to their child’s diagnosis. We found that good family communication and family hardiness have a positive affect on how families adapt. Families of children with Down syndrome have the potential to lead full and productive lives and positively adapt to their child’s diagnosis. Abstract: Background: Down syndrome is a genetic condition that affects people of all races, nationalities and socioeconomic status.

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 10:23

Women's perspectives on home‐based care for family members with chronic illness: An Interpretive phenomenology study

The number of people with chronic illness who need home‐based care is increasing globally. Home‐based care is socially constructed to be work carried out by women. However, little attention has been paid to the opinions of middle‐aged women caring for family members with chronic illness at home. In this study, Thai women's perspectives on home‐based care for family members with chronic illness using interpretive phenomenology were identified. Fifteen middle‐aged women were interviewed twice, and the data were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 09:38

A prompt and practical on-site support programme for family caregivers of persons with dementia: a preliminary uncontrolled interventional study

Despite the abundance of randomized clinical trial interventions for family caregivers (FCs) who look after persons with dementia, the extent to which these findings can be effectively implemented in a real‐world clinical setting is questionable.1 Indeed, a prompt and practical support programme for real clinical settings would benefit FCs, especially given the long hours that they spend caregiving,

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 09:31

The last taboo: The experience of violence in first-episode psychosis caregiving relationships

Objectives: Informal caregiving relationships play an important role in facilitating recovery outcomes in psychosis. The relationship can serve as a source of positive experiences that co-exist alongside common challenges typically associated with mental health problems. People with psychosis, when compared to the general population, are more likely to perpetrate acts of violence, a relationship that is particularly evident during the first psychosis episode.

Wed, 02/06/2019 - 12:07

Informal caregivers of people with an intellectual disability in England: health, quality of life and impact of caring

There is wide variation in reported impact of caring on caregiver well-being, and often a negative appraisal of caregiving. Researchers are beginning to question the robustness of the evidence base on which negative appraisals are based. The present study aimed to draw on data from a population-representative sample to describe the health, quality of life and impact of caring of informal caregivers of people with an intellectual disability.

Tue, 01/22/2019 - 14:29

Burnout in early course psychosis caregivers: the role of illness beliefs and coping styles

Aims In occupational settings, burnout is a common response to chronic exposure stressors and has been frequently documented in formal caregivers (i.e. paid psychiatric staff). However, the literature is limited on reports of burnout among informal caregivers and particularly within early psychosis groups. The current study sought to investigate reports of burnout in carers of young adults treated within a specialist early psychosis service and links with key appraisals reported about the illness and coping.

Mon, 01/21/2019 - 16:50

Social networks, social support and social negativity: A qualitative study of head and neck cancer caregivers' experiences

Head and neck cancer is a serious form of cancer that can generate substantial physical and psychosocial morbidity. Informal caregivers can help patients to manage head and neck cancer and its emotional impacts, both during and after treatment. Caregivers, however, can experience considerable stress as a result of their caring activities. Supportive relationships can protect caregivers from psychosocial strain.

Wed, 12/19/2018 - 10:03

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