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Prevention

Supporting carers to care in a crisis: an analysis of additional service provision essential to carers of people with learning disabilities

Research into how unpaid carers for people with learning disabilities cope with 'crisis' in their lives and the lives of those they care for was commissioned by Gwalia Housing in Wales. Twenty four carers who had experienced a crisis situation were interviewed. Although carers feedback found great variation in carers experience and definitions of crisis, the most frequent theme was that a crisis was something that stopped carers carrying out their duties.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Challenging behaviour and learning disabilities: prevention and interventions for people with learning disabilities whose behaviour challenges: NG11

This guideline covers interventions and support for children, young people and adults with a learning disability and behaviour that challenges. It highlights the importance of understanding the cause of behaviour that challenges, and performing thorough assessments so that steps can be taken to help people change their behaviour and improve their quality of life. The guideline also covers support and intervention for family members or carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

The economic and social cost of dementia in Ireland

The economic and social burden of dementia on society is the value of all the resources used to prevent, diagnose, treat, and generally cope with the illness. This article assess the overall resource implications of dementia in Ireland. Six main areas are covered in the cost analysis as follows: mortality and life years lost, in-patient acute care, in-patient psychiatric care, residential long-stay care, family care, and primary and social care in the community.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

The unmet support needs of family members caring for a suicidal person

Background: The prevention of suicide is a key aim for health care authorities and society in general and family members have a principal role in caring for suicidal people. However, the support needs of these essential family carers are relatively unknown. Aim: To explore the support needs of family members of suicidal people. Method: Eighteen participants were interviewed using a short topic guide. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis and confirmed by discussion. Findings: Family members of suicidal people have unmet needs (this was the main theme).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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