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Organisational culture

Barriers to genuine consumer and carer participation from the perspectives of Australian systemic mental health advocates

Background: Consumer and carer participation in mental health service development and evaluation has widespread nominal support. However, genuine and consistent participation remains elusive due to systemic barriers.

Aims: This paper explores barriers to reform for mental health services from the perspectives of consumers and carers actively engaged in advocating for improvements in the mental health system.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Employers' knowledge and attitudes regarding organizational policy toward workers caring for aging family members

The study examined employers' knowledge of and attitudes toward working carers who care for aging family members. The study was based on the ecological model. One hundred employers were interviewed using structured questionnaires and 13 employers by additional in-depth interviews. Both research instruments included areas of disruption to the organization, existing policies, and feasibility as to developing appropriate policies to support working carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Using strengths-based practice to support culture change: an Australian experience

Workplaces across the globe have experienced an unprecedented pace of change. The effects of a problem focus, de-personalisation and over regulation in long-term care settings are experienced similarly by carers, residents, their families and nursing homes as a whole. A pathology focus is no longer appropriate, inviting a paradigm shift to explore how accessing the unique strengths and resources of all parties becomes an imperative role in changing organizational culture. This paper draws comparisons between the experiences and tasks of all those involved in care settings.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Principles of participation

The video explores how service user and carer participation has become an increasingly important part of how adult social care services are developed and delivered. The video uses the example of how Manchester adult social care services are involving service users and carers. The film highlights the jigsaw model of participation, this connects four aspects of participation: Culture, Structure, Practice and Review. For further details about the jigsaw model see SCIE Guide 17. Participation operates at many different levels, from individual care packages to service design and commissioning.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The impact of organisational culture on the delivery of person-centred care in services providing respite care and short breaks for people with dementia

Ensuring the development and delivery of person-centred care in services providing respite care and short breaks for people with dementia and their carers has a number of challenges for health and social service providers. This article explores the role of organisational culture in barriers and facilitators to person-centred dementia care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Co-production in social care: what it is and how to do it (Guide)

This is a guide to what co-production is and how to develop co-productive approaches to working with people who use services and carers. It is aimed at managers and commissioners, frontline practitioners and people who use services and carers.The first section looks at what co-production is and the principles on which co-productive approaches should be based. It also outlines the policy context, including how co-production relates to the Care Act 2014 and personalisation, the economic impact of co-production.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09