Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Support groups for Alzheimer’s caregivers: Creating our own space in uncertain times

Support groups for Alzheimer’s caregivers: Creating our own space in uncertain times

Older men are often excluded from family caregiving research despite the steady increase in the number of husbands assuming primary caregiving roles. We explored perceptions of older, male caregivers’ experiences with caring for a wife with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and examined what aspects of the support group were beneficial. Our qualitative research methods invited six caregivers ranging in age from 74 to 85 years to narratively construct their perspectives on caring for their wives with Alzheimer’s Disease and benefits of participation in an all-male support group. Thematic analyses revealed caregivers faced several transitions. “Losses related to their personal relationships with their wife, family, and self,” captured as loss of golden years. The second area, benefits and improvements of support groups, were captured in the following theme: “creating our own space,” which included two sub-themes: “releasing our frustration” and “developing coping strategies.” There was also “Gendered experience of caregiving.” This study revealed that male caregivers benefited from the support and company of other men in similar caregiving situations. Results from this study have implications for health care professionals for the development of psychosocial educational groups aimed at providing support to male caregivers. 

Access source material through DOI

Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
Type of Work
Journal article
Publisher
Taylor & Francis Ltd
ISBN/ISSN
15332985
Publication Year
2018
Issue Number
3
Journal Titles
Social Work in Mental Health
Volume Number
16
Start Page
303
End Page
320