Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - Arksey, Hilary

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Arksey, Hilary

Arksey, Hilary

Rationed care: assessing the support needs of informal carers in English social services authorities

The passing of the Carers (Recognition and Services Act) 1995 was a step forward in trying to ensure that people who provide informal care to disabled, sick or elderly relatives or friends are properly recognised and properly supported. The Carers Act gave informal carers the right to an assessment of their own needs, and this article is based on a study into the impact of the legislation in four local authority social services departments. It is argued that the vision of supporters of the Carers Act, namely to achieve real benefits for many carers, has yet to be realised.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Combining Work and Care: The Reality of Policy Tensions for Carers

Without the contribution of informal carers of disabled, sick & older people, organised social care in England & Wales could not cope. However, carers can often experience financial hardship, poor health & social isolation, & may find it difficult to combine work & care. The government has developed policies to support carers in their caring role, while also introducing measures to assist carers to work, reflecting the emphasis on paid work as a driving force to reduce poverty.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

Informal carers count

The government strategy 'Caring About Carers' acknowledges that state care provision can never replace that of informal carers. Nurses working in primary and community health care potentially have a key role in identifying informal carers, meeting their health needs and ensuring they know of their rights to an assessment under the Carers Act. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Caregiver Assessment of Support Need, Reaction to Care, and Assessment of Depression

The aims of this study were to: (a) identify New Zealand informal carers' support needs; (b) assess caregivers' depression; and (c) assess positive and negative aspects of caregiving. A sample of 287 carers from throughout New Zealand was recruited by advertisements in carer support organizations literature, in 2008. Data were collected using Centre for Epidemiologic Short Depression scale (CES-D10), Caregivers Reaction Assessment scale (CRA), and open-ended questions. Carer burden was significant (p ≤ .01) in the 60 to 69 age group.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Respite care for people with dementia: the range of models for getting a break

Hilary Arksey and Claire Bamford report on the first stage of a two-year national study of respite care and short breaks for people with dementia and their carers

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Managing money in later life: help from relatives and friends

Growing numbers of older people need help with financial matters, and relatives and friends are likely to be the first involved. At the same time, older people's financial resources are increasingly complex. In some families, differences in expectations or conflicts of interest among different members may bring further complications. A scoping study found a lack of systematic information on the role of carers in helping older people manage money and assets.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Unpaid carers' access to and use of primary care services

General medical practitioners (GPs) and members of the primary care team have a pivotal role in supporting unpaid carers in their caring role and helping them to maintain their own health and well-being. This paper investigates the difference that caregiving makes to individuals’ access to and use of GP and primary care services. It is based on longitudinal analysis of carers’ contacts with GPs, and a review of the literature including evaluations of measures to improve primary-care-based support for carers. Men increase their consultation rates with GPs when taking on a caring role.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Caring attitudes

Up to one and a half million people in Britain are involved in caring for a relative or friend with mental illness or dementia. Recent government policy has emphasised the needs of this particular group of carers, but effective support can be implemented only if managers and practitioners know what works.

Looks at the findings from a review of mental health carer support and the effectiveness of the services on offer. The review was carried out by the Social Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at the University of York.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Respite care and short breaks: what works and at what cost?

It is important to find out which services benefit people with dementia and their carers most: in particular whether carers gain more support from respite care and short breaks or from other services. Hilary Arksey and Helen Weatherly review the research evidence to date and comment on its limitations, given the wide range of different services covered.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Access to health care for carers: barriers and interventions: report for the National Co-ordinating Centre for NHS Service Delivery and Organisation R & D (NCCSDO)

Background The General Household Survey 2000 shows that approximately 6.8 million adults in Britain provide care to sick or disabled relatives or friends, or the elderly. Carers report high levels of stress, anxiety and depression, as well as general health problems and physical injuries such as strained backs associated with lifting. The more demanding care, the less likely it is that carers will have time to attend to their own health care needs.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Page 1 of 2