Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - Dearden, Chris

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Dearden, Chris

Dearden, Chris

Young carers in the UK: the 2004 report

This is the report of the third national survey of young carers who are being supported by specialist young carers projects across the UK. Throughout the report, where appropriate and for comparison, we refer to the two previous surveys conducted in 1995 and 1997 (Dearden and Becker, 1995, 1998). The 2004 Report is based on data collected from 87 projects concerning a total of 6,178 young carers – the largest survey of its kind. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Listening to children: Meeting the needs of young carers

This chapter examines the impact of caring on the lives of young people (i.e. those under 18). The authors point to the difficulties in enumerating such carers. They estimate numbers in excess of 50,000. Although the issue of young caring is not new, research into the phenomenon is. The authors refer to the initial studies of the late 1980s and early 1990s. They focus on the work of the Young Carers Research Group (YCRG), established in 1992. The Group has an on-going work programme which aims to give young carers a voice, raise awareness and influence policy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Young Carers in the UK

Discusses the "Young Carers in the UK: The 2004 Report" which focuses on the third national survey of young carers in Great Britain. Data collection for the survey; Information on people with care needs; Range of caring tasks young people perform; Percentage of young carers providing different tasks; Impact of caring tasks on educational experiences of carers; Percentage of young carers assessed under the Children Act.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Growing up caring: vulnerability and transition to adulthood: young carers' experiences

When young people care for a parent with illness or disability their lives are different. This study 'examines the young carer's transition to adulthood'. The profile of 60 young carers is described; half were in lone parent families. Almost all were performing domestic tasks as well as providing general and/or personal care; some were also caring for younger children. Education, training and employment opportunities were, in reality, not available to them. Most of the families were outside the labour market and received welfare benefits. Social exclusion and poverty were widespread.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09