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Glendinning, Caroline

Updated review of research on risk and adult social care in England

This paper updates an earlier extensive review of research into the incidence and management of risk in adult social care in England, and addresses gaps identified in the earlier review. This paper aimed to identify only empirical research published since 2007 and concentrated on research conducted and published within the UK.

The review:

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Comparing and contrasting the role of family carers and nurses in the domestic health care of frail older people

Care in the community has been constructed on the basis of professional support for carers who, as a result of community care policy that has released highly dependent people from residential care and long-stay wards, are carrying out a wide range of tasks, including complex health care activities. The present paper examines the health care activities currently undertaken by family carers and the way in which they work with, and are supported by, professional nurses in the home. It compares and contrasts the approaches of both groups to care-giving for this client group.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Rethinking social care and support : what can England learn from other countries?

This Viewpoint, written by Caroline Glendinning at the University of York and David Bell at the University of Stirling, draws on the experiences of other countries to argue that social care is a collective, welfare state responsibility rather than an individual, private responsibility.

Other key points include: 

  • social care arrangements in many other countries are equal and universal: everyone is eligible regardless of wealth, and people with similar levels of disability receive care no matter where they live;

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Keeping personal budgets personal: learning from the experiences of older people, people with mental health problems and their carers

This report presents findings from research into the experiences of using personal budgets for older people, people with mental health problems and their carers, with suggestions for good practice and future improvement.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Dependence, independence or inter-dependence? Revisiting the concepts of 'care' and 'dependency'

Research and theory on ‘dependency’ and ‘care-giving’ have to date proceeded along largely separate lines, with little sense that they are exploring and explaining different aspects of the same phenomenon. Research on ‘care’, initially linked to feminism during the early 1980s, has revealed and exposed to public gaze what was hitherto assumed to be a ‘natural’ female activity. Conversely, disability activists and writers who have promoted a social model of disability have seen the language of and the policy focus upon ‘care’ as oppressive and objectifying.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

‘If they’re helping me then how can I be independent?’ The perceptions and experience of users of home-care re-ablement services

Home-care re-ablement is a short-term, intensive service that helps people to (re-) establish their capacity and confidence in performing basic personal care and domestic tasks at home, thereby reducing needs for longer term help. Home-care re-ablement is an increasingly common feature of English adult social care services; there are similar service developments in Australia and New Zealand. This paper presents evidence from semi-structured interviews conducted in early 2010 with 34 service users and 10 carers from five established re-ablement services in England.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Support for carers of older people: some intranational and national comparisons: a review of the literature prepared for the Audit Commission

During 2003 the Audit Commission conducted a study of services and support for the carers of older people in England, with a particular emphasis on the implementation of the national Carer's Strategy. In order to place this study in context, a background study was commissioned into the approaches taken in a number of other countries to supporting carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Carer's aspirations and decisions around work and retirement

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) commissioned the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York to conduct research exploring the aspirations and decisions around work and retirement of people looking after disabled or sick relatives, friends, or older people. The study involved three elements: a literature review; in-depth interviews with 80 carers; and focus groups with professionals from Jobcentre Plus, social services departments and carers organisations who worked with carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Ambiguity in practice? Carers' roles in personalised social care in England

Carers play an ambiguous role within the personalisation paradigm currently shaping adult social care practice in England. Although carers have rights to assessments and support in their own right, these rights sit uneasily alongside the practices of assessment, support planning and personal budget (PB) allocation for older and disabled people. This paper reports how 14 dyads of older and learning disabled people with cognitive and/or communication impairments and their carers viewed the roles - desired and actual - played by carers in PBs.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Caring for a relative with dementia: the perceptions of carers and CPNs

Older people with dementia living in the community are most likely to be cared for by other older people, predominantly spouses, who will be at increased risk of stress‐related health problems themselves. Appropriate support of such carers is crucial if carer breakdown and consequent care‐receiver admission to residential homes is to be avoided. This paper examines the experience of older carers of frail older people with dementia and examines the kind of support that is provided to such carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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