Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - Lawn, Sharon

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Lawn, Sharon

Lawn, Sharon

The development of a positive behaviour support programme for families following acquired brain injury

Background/Aims: Families require more specialised support to manage behaviours of concern following acquired brain injury within community settings. Evidence supports the involvement of family caregivers in behaviour interventions, however there are no validated behaviour support approaches for individuals with acquired brain injury emphasising family involvement.

Tue, 05/28/2019 - 16:38

Exploring the potential for family carers to support people with mental illness to stop smoking

Cigarette smoking poses significant health burdens for people with mental illness. They die sooner than they should, and smoking is a major contributor to their high rates of morbid chronic physical health conditions and early mortality, compared to the general population. Family carers provide important support to people with mental illness. However, family carers' perspectives of smoking by their family members with mental illness are largely absent from the research literature and from practice, despite smoking rates remaining high and quit rates remaining low for this population.

Wed, 04/10/2019 - 15:11

Accessing mental health services for older people in rural South Australia

Mental healthcare for older people is primarily delivered in the community with informal carers, usually family providing much of this. Older people often require input from a range of services across sectors. In Australia, the different funding and governance structures of these services makes for a complex landscape for older people, their families and mental health workers to navigate. As many people now care into later life, the consequences of not getting the required support include the potential for increased carer burden and reduced capacity to fulfil caring tasks.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

What carers of family members with mental illness say, think and do about their relative's smoking and the implications for health promotion and service delivery: a qualitative study

Few researchers have explored family carers’ perspectives of smoking by their family members with mental illness, despite smoking rates remaining high for people with mental illness. In-depth qualitative interviews with twelve South Australian family carers explored their experiences and views of providing care for people with mental illness who smoke. Data were analysed thematically. Around the central theme of the caring role within the context of mental illness and smoking, were three interrelated themes: (1) responsibility; (2) accommodation; and, (3) dissonance.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15