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Greenwood, N.

'What happens when I can no longer care?' Informal carers' concerns about facing their own illness or death: a qualitative focus group study

OBJECTIVES: Older informal carers play an increasingly important role in supporting others with long-term health conditions. This study aimed to explore in depth the perspectives of older carers (70+ years) supporting others with a variety of conditions and disabilities focusing on their thoughts and experiences about when they are unable to continue caring. DESIGN: Qualitative with four focus groups. SETTING: Greater London, UK. PARTICIPANTS: 28 older carers (70+ years) recruited from the voluntary sector participated in this study.

Wed, 10/09/2019 - 12:47

A qualitative study of older informal carers’ experiences and perceptions of their caring role

Background and aims: Unpaid family carers, or caregivers as they are also known, often play a vital role in supporting others with illness or disability living in the community. Overall numbers of carers are growing but numbers of older carers are increasing particularly rapidly as populations age worldwide. However, little research has focused on this important older group. This qualitative study therefore investigated older carers’ experiences and their perceptions of their role.

Fri, 06/07/2019 - 14:18

A qualitative study of carers' experiences of dementia cafes: a place to feel supported and be yourself

Background: Unpaid, informal carers or caregivers play an important role in supporting people living with dementia but the role can be challenging and carers themselves may benefit from support. Alzheimer’s, dementia or memory cafés are one such form of support . These cafés are usually provided in the voluntary sector and are a place where people with dementia and those supporting them, usually family carers, can meet with others in similar situations.

Mon, 03/25/2019 - 12:56

General practitioners, primary care and support for carers in England: can training make a difference?

As a part of the national carers' strategy, the Department of Health commissioned six pilot workshops spread across England for General Practitioners (GPs) and other primary healthcare workers. The six workshops were held during September and October 2009, arranged by the Royal College of General Practitioners and planned in consultation with the Princess Royal Trust for Carers. The workshops were delivered by one of two GPs and by a carer. The Department of Health commissioned an evaluation of the workshop programme.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Interprofessional teamwork in stroke care: Is it visible or important to patients and carers?

Interprofessional teamwork is seen in healthcare policy and practice as a key strategy for providing safe, efficient and holistic healthcare and is an accepted part of evidence-based stroke care. The impact of interprofessional teamwork on patient and carer experience(s) of care is unknown, although some research suggests a relationship might exist. This study aimed to explore patient and carer perceptions of good and poor teamwork and its impact on experiences of care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

Informal stroke caregivers' self-appraised problem-solving abilities as a predictor of well-being and perceived social support

Aim.  To describe the relationship between self-appraised problem-solving abilities and psychological distress, burden and perceived social support in informal, family stroke caregivers.

Background.  Previous research suggests that self-appraised problem-solving abilities play a significant role in the well-being of family caregivers of patients with chronic illness. However, little is known about its role in caregivers of stroke survivors.

Design.  Prospective correlational study.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

Informal caring for stroke survivors: Meta-ethnographic review of qualitative literature

Stroke is a very common cause of adult disability often leaving stroke survivors dependent on others. Much of this support comes from informal carers. Research has demonstrated the importance of these carers to survivors’ recovery but also suggests that caregiving has adverse consequences. Meta-ethnography was applied to review qualitative research looking at informal stroke carers’ experiences and responses to caring. Electronic databases from 2006 to 2009 were searched and after application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven studies were reviewed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Loss of autonomy, control and independence when caring: a qualitative study of informal carers of stroke survivors in the first three months after discharge

Purpose. Stroke has far reaching effects on both stroke survivors and their informal carers. Research has highlighted changes in autonomy of stroke survivors, but insufficient focus has been put on the associated reduced control and independence of their informal carers. This study investigates the experiences of informal carers of stroke survivors from discharge to 3 months later.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

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