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British nursing index bni - exported on 8/7/2016

Supporting lay carers in end of life care: current gaps and future priorities

Informal carers are central to the achievement of end of life care and death at home and to policy aims of enabling patient choice towards end of life. They provide a substantial, yet hidden contribution to our economy. This entails considerable personal cost to carers, and it is recognised that their needs should be assessed and addressed. However, we lack good research evidence on how best to do this. The present position paper gives an overview of the current state of carer research, its gaps and weaknesses, and outlines future priorities.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Older caregivers' coping strategies and sense of coherence in relation to quality of life

AIM: This paper reports a study to investigate coping strategies and sense of coherence in relation to gender, the extent of care, caregiving activities and health-related quality of life in a population-based sample of caregivers aged 75 and over.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Learn Now; Live Well: an educational programme for caregivers

Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Learn Now; Live Well (LNLW) educational programme on enhancing the knowledge and support of caregivers living with a life-threatening illness.

Design: A combined summative and formative evaluation design was used. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected using a questionnaire with a five-point response scale of strongly agree to strongly disagree and semi-structured interviews.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Behavioral and mental health problems in low-income children with special health care needs

This study examined caregiver perceptions of mental health problems and counseling needs in low-income children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Interviewers collected data from 257 caregivers of CSHCN (61% males; 60% African American; Mean age = 8.4 years) attending six Midwestern inner-city health clinics. Measures included the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and an investigator-designed questionnaire. CBCL T-scores indicated that 38% of CSHCN had a behavioral or mental health problem, but only 26% of caregivers perceived the need for treatment or counseling.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The association between substance use and the needs of patients with psychiatric disorder, levels of anxiety, and caregiving burden

The influence of substance use on patient's needs and caregiving consequences has received insufficient research attention. We sought to determine whether patients with comorbid substance use have higher levels of need, anxiety, depression, and caregiving consequences than those of patients who do not use substances. A total of 520 patients participated, and those who used substances (n = 216) reported higher levels of unmet needs, anxiety, and caregiving consequences than did patients who did not use substances.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

A time-sovereignty approach to understanding carers of cancer patients' experiences and support preferences

Much of the literature on informal carers of cancer patients is quantitative and psycho-oncology based. This literature has established that cancer carers experience higher rates of stress, depression and anxiety than their non-caregiving counterparts, with younger female carers reporting higher rates of burden and unmet needs. The reasons behind this variation and variations in support preferences are poorly understood: some carers prefer support groups and others prefer practical support. This study takes a sociological approach to exploring carers' varied experiences.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

'At the foot of a very long ladder': discussing the end of life with older people and informal caregivers

Context: International policy advocates the development of approaches to raise public awareness about end-of-life-care issues, so that when people face a final illness, they may better articulate their needs for care. This article reports findings from one approach of engaging older members of the general public and informal caregivers in discussions about end-of-life care.

Objectives: To increase understanding of the concerns many older people have around end-of-life issues and provide advice and information to address these.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

How are the carers being cared for? A review of the literature

The purpose of our study was to identify the information and support needed by carers of the terminally ill or those receiving palliative care. Carers, in this instance, are family members, friends or neighbours. A review of the literature was sponsored by Help the Hospices’ four-year project, Care for the Carers of the Terminally Ill, funded by the Tubney Charitable Trust. The review was conducted in August 2006 and the content analysis was completed in October that year.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The quality and adequacy of care received at home in the last 3 months of life by people who died following a stroke: a retrospective survey of surviving family and friends using the Views of Informal Carers Evaluation of Services questionnaire

Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the UK. Despite this, little is known about the care needs of people who die from or following a stroke. In early 2003, a total of 183 questionnaires were returned from a survey of 493 people who had registered a stroke-related death in four Primary Care Trusts, giving a response rate of 37%. This paper reports on 53 deceased from the survey who had lived at home during their last 3 months and who had been ill for more than 1 month.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Improving the interface between informal carers and formal health and social services: A qualitative study

Reports about the impact of caring vary widely, but a consistent finding is that the role is influenced (for better or worse) by how formal services respond to, and work with informal carers and of course the cared for person. We aimed to explore the connection between informal and formal cares and identify how a positive connection or interface might be developed and maintained. We undertook a qualitative descriptive study with focus groups and individual interviews with informal carers, formal care service providers and representatives from carer advocacy groups.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

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