Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - Communication

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Communication

Communication

The use of Talking Mats to support people with dementia and their carers to make decisions together

Policy guidelines insist that people with dementia should be involved in decisions about key life choices and transitions. However, as dementia affects both cognitive and communication difficulties, it becomes increasingly difficult to do this, and innovative and effective ways to support people with dementia and their carers to interact with each other are needed. This project, funded by Joseph Rowntree Foundation, examined if Talking Mats, a low-tech communication framework, could support family carers and people with dementia to discuss issues around daily living with each other.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Copying letters to service users with learning disabilities: opinions of service users, carers and professionals working within learning disability services

The NHS Plan, Department of Health (2000) made a commitment that patients should be able to receive copies of clinicians’ letters about them as a right in order to improve communication and enable patients to participate in their care. In South Gloucestershire, the opinions of local service users with learning disabilities, their carers, and professionals working within learning disability services about this issue were sought using questionnaires and focus groups in order to identify and then develop good practice.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

SCIE research briefing 12: involving individual older patients and their carers in the discharge process from acute to community care: implications for intermediate care

This web-based briefing provides a concise summary of the research and policy literature into the means, benefits and difficulties of involving patients in the planning of discharge to community or intermediate care. It also considers the role of carers in this process, as well as what happens when an older person’s ability to communicate their preferences in these matters is affected by dementia, language difficulties, or an unwillingness or reluctance to express preferences about the provision of care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Poetry, philosophy and dementia

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of poetry by family carers as a way into the inner world of a person with late stage dementia, consistent with their values, preferences and experiences; enhancing the wellbeing of both the person with dementia and family carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Partners in care: sharing

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

My wife, Pauline, died from Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 59. She was 51 when diagnosed after several years of problems. I cared for her at home. For the first 3 years, I maintained my employment, albeit on an increasingly part-time basis, but resigned from work and cared for her full-time for 5 years when her needs demanded round-the-clock attention. She remained in her own home to within 5 weeks of her death, when fracturing my leg put paid to my direct caring role.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Chatter matters: advice on communication for carers

Colin Barnes describes how he sets about offering communication advice to family carers of people with dementia, and the materials he has developed to help carers understand the reasons for common difficulties and strategies for more successful communication

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

The good doctor: the carer's perspective

Carers are family members, friends, and neighbours who perform medical tasks and personal care, manage housekeeping and financial affairs, and provide emotional support to people who are ill, disabled, or elderly. From a carer's perspective, the primary requisite for a good doctor is competence. Assuming equal technical skills and knowledge, the difference between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ doctors comes down to attitudes and behaviour-communication. An important aspect of communication is what doctors say to carers, and how they interpret what carers say to them.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Telecare in practice: a telecare initiative focusing on carers of older people based on ACTION

There is a continual need to support and assist carers who play a central role in providing informal care for a relative. This approach to care provision must have a strong foundation based on liaison between the family carers, professional carers and the older or disabled person who is the focus of care. Services that enable effective communication using videoconferencing, interactive communication, tailored Web based programs and other specific resources configured for the needs of the individual can help carers carry out their role effectively.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

A qualitative analysis of changes in relationship dynamics and roles between people with cancer and their primary informal carer

It is widely accepted that cancer is an intersubjective experience that impacts upon the psychological well-being of people with cancer and informal carers, as well as on couple relationships. This qualitative study examined the nature and consequences of cancer on the relationship between informal carers and the person with cancer, from the perspective of Australian cancer carers. Sixty-two carers (42 women and 20 men), across a range of cancer types, stages and relationship dyads took part in semi-structured interviews.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Being there

The Parkinson's Disease Society has produced a DVD, Being There, which aims to answer the questions and concerns of people newly diagnosed with the condition. Being There provides an insight into symptoms, treatments and life with Parkinson's in general, and includes interviews with people with Parkinson's, carers, and expert healthcare professionals The DVD is divided into four chapters: introduction to Parkinson's disease; treating Parkinson's; living with Parkinson's; and about the Parkinson's Disease Society.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Page 7 of 10