Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Cancer patients

Cancer patients

Costs of an ostomy self-management training program for cancer survivors

Objective: To measure incremental expenses to an oncologic surgical practice for delivering a community-based, ostomy nurse-led, small-group, behavior skills-training intervention to help bladder and colorectal cancer survivors understand and adjust to their ostomies and improve their health-related quality of life, as well as assist family caregivers to understand survivors' needs and provide appropriate supportive care.

Fri, 10/19/2018 - 16:20

Communication among cancer patients, caregivers, and hospice nurses: Content, process and change over time

Objective: First, to describe communication of home hospice nurse visits to cancer patient-caregiver dyads. Second, to assess change in communication related to domains of care over the course of visits. Methods: Multi-site prospective observational longitudinal study of audio-recorded home hospice visits (N=537 visits; 101 patient-caregiver dyads; 58 nurses). Communication was coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System to describe content and process.

Wed, 10/03/2018 - 12:16

Relationships between family resilience and posttraumatic growth in breast cancer survivors and caregiver burden

Objective: To examine the relationships between family resilience and posttraumatic growth (PTG) of breast cancer survivors and caregiver burden among principal caregivers in China.<bold>Methods: </bold>Participants in this cross-sectional study comprised 108 women aged 26 to 74 years (M = 49, SD = 9) with early-stage breast cancer and 108 principal caregivers. Participants were recruited from a comprehensive cancer center of a public hospital in Shandong Province, China.

Mon, 09/10/2018 - 19:14

Participation and interest in support services among family caregivers of older adults with cancer

Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe distressed and underprepared family caregiver's use of and interest in formal support services (eg, professional counseling, education, organizational assistance). Method: Cross-sectional mail survey conducted in communities of 8 cancer centers in Tennessee, Alabama, and Florida (response rate: 42%).

Mon, 09/10/2018 - 15:03

Initial perceptions of palliative care: An exploratory qualitative study of patients with advanced cancer and their family caregivers

Background: Despite evidence for early integration of palliative care for people with advanced cancer and their families, patterns of late engagement continue. Prior research has focused on health professionals’ attitudes to palliative care with few studies exploring the views of patients and their carers. Aim: To explore initial perceptions of palliative care when this is first raised with patients with advanced cancer and their families in Australian settings.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 11:32

Macmillan Carers Schemes in England: results of a multicentre evaluation

Maintaining sick and elderly people at home, particularly as they approach the end of life, is a long-established challenge for health and social care services. Over the past 30 years palliative care providers have attempted a variety of innovations in this area. We report on a descriptive study of seven pilot Macmillan Carers Schemes in England. The schemes sought to provide practical and emotional help to cancer patients and families living in their own homes. Data are available on 624 referrals to the schemes over a 1-year period.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Dying from cancer in developed and developing countries: lessons from two qualitative interview studies of patients and their carers

Objective: To describe the experiences of illness and needs and use of services in two groups of patients with incurable cancer, one in a developed country and the other in a developing country.

Design: Scotland: longitudinal study with qualitative interviews. Kenya: cross sectional study with qualitative interviews.

Settings: Lothian region, Scotland, and Meru District, Kenya.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Clinical update. The management of nausea and vomiting in advanced cancer

Nausea and vomiting represent a significant problem in patients with advanced cancer which not only affects their quality of life but also the lives of informal carers. The application of nursing assessment tools, underpinned by a thorough knowledge regarding the physiology and aetiology of nausea arid vomiting in this group of patients enables nurses to plan and provide effective interventions, in collaboration with other members of the multidisciplinary team. This article describes the physiological basis of nausea and vomiting.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Supporting informal caregivers of people with advanced cancer: a literature review

Informal carers are people who provide care without a specific professional role. They provide diverse caregiving supports including disease-related problems, side effects of treatment and psychosocial impacts. This paper reports on a comprehensive review of caregiving literature, focusing specifically on cancer caregivers. The paper presents five observations drawn from the literature in order to make recommendations about how caregivers of people with advanced cancer can best be supported.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

The role of district nursing: perspectives of cancer patients and their carers before and after hospital discharge

The role of the district nurse (DN) is difficult to define. Knowledge about the perspectives of patients with cancer, and their informal carers, on the roles of DNs and community services is lacking. The aim of this study is to identify the roles of DNs and community services as perceived by patients with cancer and their carers before and after hospital discharge. Seventy-one pre- and post-discharge conversational interviews were conducted with cancer patients and carers, and analysed thematically.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19