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“I Know Who I Am; the Real Me, and That Will Come Back”: The Importance of Relational Practice in Improving Outcomes for Carers of People With Dementia

Effective support to carers of people with dementia can be critical to maintain quality of life for people with dementia and their families and to sustain the future of health and care systems. Qualitative interviews were undertaken with 14 carers of people with dementia across Scotland, and the data were analysed to identify the outcomes important to the carers. The importance of relationships emerged as the core theme, including relationship with the person with dementia, family members, other carers, and professionals.

Thu, 07/30/2020 - 14:58

Anxiety in Informal Dementia Carers: A Meta-Analysis of Prevalence

Much of the carer literature has focused on depression and burden as primary outcomes and anxiety appear somewhat neglected. Providing evidence on the prevalence of carer anxiety is critical as it can enhance awareness among professionals, which in turn can lead to improved access to efficacious treatments. This meta-analysis updated the previous review conducted in 2007 to estimate the up-to-date prevalence of anxiety in informal carers for people with dementia. Literature searches were conducted in databases of published and unpublished literature.

Thu, 07/30/2020 - 11:52

Effectiveness of a psychoeducational intervention for caregivers of People With Dementia with regard to burden, anxiety and depression: A systematic review

Aim To assess the effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions with respect to burden, anxiety and depression in family caregivers of People With Dementia living at home. Background In dementia, the family assumes the role of main caregiver, maintaining the patient in a good state of health. Nevertheless, burden, anxiety and depression may have negative repercussions in caregivers. Therefore, professional supports through psychoeducational programmes are recommended as interventions for improving caregivers' health.

Mon, 07/27/2020 - 12:06

Supporting patients and carers affected by pancreatic cancer: A feasibility study of a counselling intervention

Purpose: Patients with pancreatic cancer have extremely high unmet psychological and physical needs. Family carers of these patients have even higher levels of distress than patients. Our purpose was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a counselling intervention in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and their carers. Methods: We conducted a single-arm feasibility study of the PREPARES (Patients and RElatives affected by PAncreatic cancer: Referral, Education and Support) pilot intervention.

Tue, 07/07/2020 - 15:31

Investigating 'optimal time': perspectives on the timing of people living with dementia moving into care homes: research findings

This briefing summarises the findings of a study into whether there is a universal optimal time for people living with dementia to move to a care home. The research drew on the experiences of people living with dementia and family carers, as well as social workers and care home managers. It found that factors to consider include the wellbeing of the person living with dementia, the ability of family members to support them and the availability of suitable care home places.

Wed, 07/01/2020 - 14:16

Cygnus: a psychoeducational group for carers of people with a personality disorder

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance suggests that carers of individuals with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder experience high levels of psychological distress, yet few services in the UK offer specific support to this group of carers. This article will describe the development of a psychoeducational carers' group based on schema theory (Young et al, 2003), including the development of the role of carer experts-by-experience as group co-facilitators.

Tue, 06/16/2020 - 13:47

Caregiving work: The experiences and needs of caregivers in Australia

A considerable evidence base exists demonstrating the high prevalence of family caregiving in the community; however, there is a paucity of in-depth research examining the impact of family caregiving on the living and employment needs of those providing this unpaid service. This study employed a qualitative interview design with purposive sampling to examine the experiences of family caregivers, in order to examine how family caregiving decisions are made, the nature and challenges of caregiving work, and living and work supports that may enhance the caregiving experience.

Wed, 06/10/2020 - 12:55

What is known from the existing literature about peer support interventions for carers of individuals living with dementia: A scoping review

This scoping review comprehensively describes evidence of using peer support to assist informal carers of individuals with dementia (any type). A systematic search of 11 databases (CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, ProQuest, TRIP and PubMed) was conducted for research published between 2007-2017 focussing on informal dementia carers, and research designs with interventions incorporating or consisting exclusively of peer support. Authors worked independently to screen retrieved articles, review applicability and extract data.

Wed, 02/26/2020 - 15:34

Informal carers' experiences of caring for a person with heart failure in a community setting

Heart failure (HF) is a life-limiting condition with a poor prognosis and unpredictable disease trajectory. HF brings physical and emotional challenges for patients and their carers. Predominantly the informal carer population consists of older females, however, caring is evolving as longevity increases and complex conditions are becoming more commonplace. Consequently, more men and younger people are contributing to daily care. The aim of this study was to explore the positive as well as negative dimensions of caring in HF across a range of carer characteristics.

Mon, 02/17/2020 - 12:42

Increasing self-efficacy and knowledge in carer training: Hispanic versus Caucasian

Aim: Nurses are teachers to their patients and need to know best practices for diverse families living with dementia. Little is known about Hispanic beliefs around dementia knowledge and self-efficacy that may have an impact on the learning situation. Design: A pre-/postresearch design was used in this intervention study with a baseline assessment of dementia knowledge and caregiver self-efficacy and a reassessment at training completion.

Mon, 02/17/2020 - 12:18

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