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CONSENSUS (Social sciences)

What are the essential features of resilience for informal caregivers of people living with dementia? A Delphi consensus examination

Objectives: Few studies have examined what might enable or prevent resilience in carers of people with dementia. Consequently, there are limited insights as to how it should be understood, defined and measured. This creates challenges for research, and also practice in terms of how it might best be promoted. This study aimed to address these limitations and add new insights, identifying the essential features of resilience in dementia caregiving.

Wed, 01/02/2019 - 15:33

End-of-life care: A qualitative study comparing the views of people with dementia and family carers

Background: In recent years, UK policy has increasingly recognised the importance of end-of-life care in dementia. While professional consensus on optimal palliative care in dementia has been reported, little is known about the perspectives of people with dementia and family carers. Aim: To compare the views of people with dementia and family carers of people with dementia (current and recently bereaved) on optimal end-of-life care. Design: Qualitative interviews (32) and a focus group were conducted. Data were thematically analysed.

Mon, 11/19/2018 - 16:27

Perspectives on family caregiving of people aging with intellectual disability affected by dementia: Commentary from the International Summit on Intellectual Disability and Dementia

This article, an output of the 2016 International Summit on Intellectual Disability and Dementia, examines familial caregiving situations within the context of a support-staging model for adults with intellectual disability (ID) affected by dementia. Seven narratives offer context to this support-staging model to interpret situations experienced by caregivers. The multidimensional model has two fundamental aspects: identifying the role and nature of caregiving as either primary (direct) or secondary (supportive); and defining how caregiving is influenced by stage of dementia.

Thu, 07/05/2018 - 07:11