Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - Data collection

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Data collection

Data collection

Searching for LGBT carers: mapping a research agenda in social work and social care

Tentative efforts have been made in UK government policy and through pockets of social work and social care research to recognise how sexuality and gender identity shape the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals providing care to others. In this article, we map the literature base of existing research in the field of LGBT care provision and outline themes of LGBT caring developed from a recent eight-month scoping exercise.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Assessing the effect of a complex psychosocial intervention: a methodological note on determining measurement intervals

Aim Guidelines describing how to carry out a randomised controlled trial (RCT) provide no advice concerning when to measure an intervention effect. Possibly as a result, most papers give no rationales for the time frames chosen for data collection. This paper discusses four general strategies to identify when to collect data. Furthermore, an additional individual strategy concerning the current German young carers project is presented.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

The burden of informal care for Alzheimer's Disease: carer perceptions from an empirical study in England, Italy and Sweden

Dementia of the Alzheimer type and related disorders greatly impact not only on the lives of sufferers but also on their unpaid informal carers, who usually are spouses or children. Carers are more likely to suffer from stress, take prescribed medication and visit their physicians compared with non-carers (Burns and Rabins, 2000). Social isolation that can occur in caregiving may mean that carers may only come to the attention of formal support services when a crisis occurs and informal care arrangements break down (Wenger, 1994).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Telecare in practice: a telecare initiative focusing on carers of older people based on ACTION

There is a continual need to support and assist carers who play a central role in providing informal care for a relative. This approach to care provision must have a strong foundation based on liaison between the family carers, professional carers and the older or disabled person who is the focus of care. Services that enable effective communication using videoconferencing, interactive communication, tailored Web based programs and other specific resources configured for the needs of the individual can help carers carry out their role effectively.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Networks of informal caring: a mixed-methods approach

Care for older people is a complex phenomenon, and is an area of pressing policy concern. Bringing together literature on care from social gerontology and economics, we report the findings of a mixed-methods project exploring networks of informal caring. Using quantitative data from the British Household Panel Survey (official survey of British households), together with qualitative interviews with older people and informal carers, we describe differences in formal care networks, and the factors and decision-making processes that have contributed to the formation of the networks.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

More family responsibility, more informal care? The effect of motivation on the giving of informal care by people aged over 50 in the Netherlands compared to other European countries

Against the backdrop of ongoing population ageing, informal care occupies an important place on European political agendas. This article discusses informal caregiving by middle aged and older persons in the Netherlands and other European countries, with particular emphasis on the role played by motives. The data are drawn from SHARE. Our results show that in the Netherlands, it is mainly feelings of being needed and obligation that increase the chance of informal care being given. Deriving pleasure from an activity, by contrast, reduces the likelihood.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Valued aspects of primary palliative care: content analysis of bereaved carers' descriptions

Background: Informal carers provide the bulk of palliative home care. They largely rely on general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses to support them in this role, yet little is known about what carers themselves consider important in this support.

Aim: To identify what informal carers valued in the palliative support provided by GPs and district nurses by using carers' own descriptions of such support.

Design Of Study: Retrospective interviews. Setting: Primary care in Cambridgeshire.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Up close and personal: a qualitative study exploring the lived experience of older carers

This study explored the experiences of informal carers who were aged 65 years and over. It has been estimated that 15 per cent of those aged 65 or over provide some form of informal care in England. Despite a growing literature on the involvement of older people in research, there is a paucity of literature on the involvement of older carers. In this study, older carers were identified via a General Practice (GP) register in one urban medical practice. Data was collected through a series of focus groups, which were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Preference for place of death in Germany

Background: Dying in the preferred place is considered a key requirement for a “good death.” The aims of our study were to explore preferred places of death of deceased people and their bereaved relatives in Rhineland-Palatinate (Germany). We further wanted to assess the congruence between preferred and actual place of death.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Evidence-based planning and delivery of local support for carers : findings and feedback from a survey of local authority carers’ leads in England

This briefing presents the findings of a survey that sought to find out more about how different local authorities collect and use information about their local carer populations: the range of information sources they use to form an evidence base on carers; how they use evidence to understand local need; and how evidence influences their planning and delivery of local carer support.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Page 1 of 2