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Dignity

Improving Dignity of Care in Community-Dwelling Elderly Patients with Cognitive Decline and Their Caregivers. The Role of Dignity Therapy

Demographic changes have placed age-related mental health disorders at the forefront of public health challenges over the next three decades worldwide. Within the context of cognitive impairment and neurocognitive disorders among elderly people, the fragmentation of the self is associated with existential suffering, loss of meaning and dignity for the patient, as well as with a significant burden for the caregiver. Psychosocial interventions are part of a person-centered approach to cognitive impairment (including early stage dementia and dementia).

Mon, 04/05/2021 - 15:35

The Care of "Small Things": Aging and Dignity in Rwanda

In Rwanda, disruptions to family and social life as a result of the 1994 genocide, and the economic transformations in its aftermath, have complicated the fabric of elder care across the country. In this article, I focus on how elderly Rwandans are reconfiguring their care networks - many of which were destroyed during the genocide - by acting as caregivers and care receivers for each other on a daily basis.

Sun, 02/09/2020 - 14:30

Struggling for a dignifying care: experiences of being next of kin to patients in home health care

Background Home healthcare services are becoming more complex as a result of changing demographics in society and patients having multiple health problems requiring advanced nursing care. Next of kin often experience that they put their own life on hold, and may feel that they stand alone when life takes an unexpected turn. Aim The aim of this study was to explore next of kin's views of dignity in home healthcare services. Methods This study has a qualitative approach and content analysis was applied.

Wed, 12/18/2019 - 10:24

Dignity in people with frontotemporal dementia and similar disorders - a qualitative study of the perspective of family caregivers

Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) constitutes on average 10-15% of dementia in younger persons (≤65 years old), but can also affect older people. These patients demonstrate a decline in social conduct, and/or language aphasias, apathy, and loss of insight that is gradual and progressive. Preservation of dignity seems to be highly relevant both before and after admission to different types of institutionalized care, but the research is scant.

Fri, 04/12/2019 - 15:17

Five sources of hope for the deeply forgetful: dementia in the twenty-first century

At this point of time, two decades after intense biological research into dementia began, we need to reassess our perspective on hope, and understand the need for some redirection toward the larger questions of care when no cure is in sight. It does seem appropriate to focus more of our hope and possibly resources on care itself, and on the creation of attitudinal shifts toward the affirmation of the deeply forgetful. There is no compound available yet that promised to slow or cure dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14