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Economic aspects

Caring for the Caregiver: Identifying the Needs of Those Called to Care Through Partnerships with Congregations

As the older adult population continues to grow, the prevalence of chronic diseases is also increasing, leading to the need for novel ways of managing this large population of patients. One solution is to focus on informal caregivers. These informal caregivers already make a substantial contribution to our nation's healthcare finances and patient health outcomes.

Wed, 10/03/2018 - 13:14

Financial well-being of US parents caring for coresident children and adults with developmental disabilities: An age cohort analysis*

Background Understanding how financial well-being changes through the life course of caregiving parents of children with developmental disabilities is critically important. Methods We analyse SIPP (U.S. Census Bureau) data to describe income poverty, asset poverty, income, net worth, and liquid assets of US parents ( N = 753) of children with developmental disabilities. Results Income and asset poverty was greatest for the youngest and oldest parents.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Time-bound opportunity costs of informal care: Consequences for access to professional care, caregiver support, and labour supply estimates

The opportunity costs associated with the provision of informal care are usually estimated based on the reduced potential of the caregiver to partake in paid work (both in terms of whether they are able to undertake paid work, and if so the hours of work undertaken). In addition to the hours of informal care provided, these opportunity costs are also likely determined by the necessity to perform particular informal care tasks at specific moments of the day. The literature, to date, has largely overlooked this dimension of informal care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Funding chief rules out free care

The article reports that Andrew Dilnot, chairman of the Commission on Funding of Care and Support, has ruled out having free personal care in England. He states that free personal care will not be recommended by the commission as it will not be resilient enough if implemented. He mentions that the commission will put forward the suggestion of having partnership approach which would combine resources from state, informal carers and individuals.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08