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Employment

Does Unpaid Caregiving Erode Working Hours Among Middle-Aged Chinese Adults?

Background: Middle-aged adults are commonly confronted with the burden of paid work and multiple caregiving roles. Objectives: This paper examines the relationship between weekly hours of unpaid caregiving and hours of work using data from the baseline survey of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. Methods: The analysis was conducted on a nationally representative sample of 3645 working-age Chinese adults aged 45–60 years who were not farming and had a young grandchild and/or a parent/parent-in-law.

Thu, 08/25/2022 - 16:42

Are informal family caregivers stigmatized differently based on their gender or employment status?: a German study on public stigma towards informal long-term caregivers of older individuals

Background: Stigma and informal caregiving are determinants for health and wellbeing, but few studies have examined stigma towards informal caregiving. Public stigma may be expressed differently towards caregivers depending on their gender and employment status due to societal norms. Therefore, this study analyzes if there is a difference in public stigma shown by the general population toward informal caregivers of care recipients aged 65 years or older based on the observed caregiver’s gender or working status.

Thu, 08/18/2022 - 14:23

Providing informal care next to paid work: Explaining care-giving gratification, burden and stress among older workers

Background: With an increasing retirement age, more older adults are combining employment with informal care-giving responsibilities. However, little is known about how older workers experience care-giving activities next to their paid jobs. Objective: This study aims to fill this gap by examining how the work situation (i.e. working hours, occupational status and perceived access to human resources practices) is associated with feelings of gratification, burden and stress in care-giving.

Wed, 08/10/2022 - 13:54

A comparison of negative financial events experienced by carers and non-carers following onset of the Great Recession

Objectives and Methods: This study compares carers and non-carers as regards experiences of harmful financial events during and immediately after the Great Recession. Findings: Carer status was associated with experiencing more negative financial events since the Great Recession began, even after controlling for covariates in a negative binomial regression. Carers had higher odds of reporting: job loss; moving in with family and friends to save money; and selling possessions to make ends meet.

Wed, 08/03/2022 - 16:47

Employment of Young Adult Cancer Caregivers, Other Disease Caregivers, and Non-Caregiving Adults

Background: Young adults are increasingly taking on caregiving roles in the United States, and cancer caregivers often experience a greater burden than other caregivers. An unexpected caregiving role may disrupt caregiver employment, leading to lost earning potential and workforce re-entry challenges. Methods: We examined caregiving employment among young adult caregivers (i.e., family or friends) using the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), which included caregiving, employment, and sociodemographic variables.

Mon, 02/21/2022 - 15:58

Quality of Life and Well-being of Carers of People With Dementia: Are There Differences Between Working and Nonworking Carers? Results From the IDEAL Program

The aim of this study was to identify the differences in quality of life (QoL) and well-being between working and nonworking dementia carers and the relative contribution of psychological characteristics, caregiving experience, and social support. Multiple regressions modeled the contribution of working status, caregiver experiences, and psychological and social resources to carer QoL (EQ-5D) and well-being (WHO-5). After controlling for age, gender, carer–dyad relationship, and severity of dementia, working status contributed significant variance to EQ-5D (2%) but not to WHO-5 scores.

Fri, 07/23/2021 - 15:11

Life course partnership and employment trajectories and parental caregiving at age 55: prospective findings from a British Birth Cohort Study

We investigate whether work and partnership life courses between ages 16 and 54 predict the likelihood of providing care to a parent or parent-in-law at age 55, and whether these associations differ by gender or early life socio-economic circumstances. In the National Child Development Study (NCDS), fully adjusted models showed that strong life course ties to marriage were linked with a greater likelihood to provide parental care for both men and women.

Mon, 04/05/2021 - 17:54

Relationships between informal caregiving, health and work in the Health and Employment After Fifty study, England

Background To investigate the prevalence of caregiving and its relationship with work, health and socio-economic circumstances in the Health and Employment After Fifty (HEAF) study. Methods The HEAF study comprises 8134 men and women aged 50–64 years recruited from 24 general practices. Socio-demographic, lifestyle and health characteristics and hours per week giving personal care were elicited by postal questionnaire. Objective clinical information about diagnoses/medications was retrieved from health records.

Mon, 12/14/2020 - 11:39

The Relationship of Caregiving to Work Conflict and Supervisor Disclosure With Emotional, Physical, and Financial Strain in Employed Family Caregivers

Objective: To determine whether employed family caregiver reports of caregiving to work conflict (CWC) are associated with emotional, physical, and financial strain, and whether organizational factors, including supervisor disclosure and caregiver-friendly workplace policies, attenuate these effects.

Mon, 12/14/2020 - 11:29

The role of formal care services in supporting young people who provide unpaid care in England

A large proportion of long-term care for people with disabilities and/or long-term health conditions is provided by unpaid carers, including young people, with potential impacts on their education, employment and health. Supporting carers is a focus of long-term care practice and policy in many countries. A key part of this support in England is through provision of services to the person with care needs (often called 'replacement' care). We aimed to explore the role of replacement care services in supporting young adult carers' health, education, and employment.

Sat, 11/28/2020 - 13:55

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