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End-of-life care

Dignity of informal caregivers of migrant patients in the last phase of life: a qualitative study

Background: A key aim of palliative care is to improve the quality of life of patients and their families. To help ensure quality of life for the families of patients with migrant backgrounds, this study sought insights into the dignity of informal caregivers in migrant communities. This could improve understanding of family-centered care for migrant patients. Methods: Twenty semi-structured interviews with informal caregivers of Turkish, Moroccan, or Surinamese background living in the Netherlands were analyzed thematically.

Wed, 02/09/2022 - 11:40

Development of a Decision Aid for Patients and Families Considering Hospice

Background: Hospice is underutilized. Miscommunication, decisional complexity, and misunderstanding around engaging hospice may contribute. Shared decision making (SDM), aided by patient decision aids (PtDAs), can improve knowledge and decision quality. Currently, there are no freely available hospice-specific PtDA to facilitate conversions between patients and providers about hospice care. Objective: To develop a theory-based and unbiased hospice specific PtDA.

Tue, 02/08/2022 - 16:33

A decision aid to support family carers of people living with dementia towards the end-of-life: Coproduction process, outcome and reflections

Background: Family carers of people living with dementia often need support with making decisions about care. Many find end-of-life care decisions particularly difficult. The aim of this article is to present an evidence- and theoretical-based process for developing a decision aid to support family carers of people with dementia towards the end-of-life.

Wed, 02/02/2022 - 12:20

Constructing a new role for family carers and volunteers providing care towards the end of life: an action research approach exploring a new model of hospice care

Objective: The objective of this study was to understand the conceptualisation and development of a novel way of providing end‐of‐life care in a Cottage Hospice setting, with a focus on the role of family carers and volunteers within this care model. Methods: A participatory action research design enabled a situational analysis, together with change processes. The study setting was a hospice in the South of England, and its network of wider associates in the local health economy. Participants were purposively sampled to provide relevant information.

Tue, 02/01/2022 - 15:52

The Concerns and Experience of Decision-Making Regarding Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders Among Caregivers in Hospice Palliative Care

Background: A do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order is an important end-of-life decision. In Taiwan, family caregivers are also involved in this decision-making process. This study aimed to explore the concerns and experiences regarding DNR decisions among caregivers in Taiwan. Methods: Qualitative study was conducted. Convenience sampling was used, and 26 caregivers were recruited whose patients had a DNR order and had received hospice care or hospice home care.

Tue, 02/01/2022 - 12:45

Advance care planning and end-of-life care in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator: The perspective of relatives

Background: Little is known about the last phase of life of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators and the practice of advance care planning in this population. Aim: To describe the last phase of life and advance care planning process of patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator, and to assess relatives' satisfaction with treatment and care. Design: Mixed-methods study, including a survey and focus group study.

Fri, 12/10/2021 - 15:30

Gaps in end-of-life care and lack of support for family carers in Poland and Central Eastern Europe

The growth of life expectancy in Central Eastern Europe and increase in the number of older people in that region are the consequences of changes in the 1990s period, connected to transition from the communism into a market economy. Central Eastern Europe is already facing consequences of fast ageing and insufficient development of state health care and social services. Those result in gaps in the provision of end-of-life care and overburden of family caregivers.

Fri, 07/23/2021 - 16:10

Smartphone-Enabled, Telehealth-Based Family Conferences in Palliative Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Pilot Observational Study

Background: In the palliative care setting, infection control measures implemented due to COVID-19 have become barriers to end-of-life care discussions (eg, discharge planning and withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments) between patients, their families, and multidisciplinary medical teams. Strict restrictions in terms of visiting hours and the number of visitors have made it difficult to arrange in-person family conferences. Phone-based telehealth consultations may be a solution, but the lack of nonverbal cues may diminish the clinician-patient relationship.

Tue, 04/13/2021 - 11:10

The relationship between caregivers' perceptions of end-of-life care in long-term care and a good resident death

Objective: Quality end-of-life (EOL) care is critical for dying residents and their family/friend caregivers. While best practices to support resident comfort at EOL in long-term care (LTC) homes are emerging, research rarely explores if and how the type of care received at EOL may contribute to caregivers' perceptions of a good death. To address this gap, this study explored how care practices at EOL contributed to caregivers' perceptions of a good resident death.; Method: This study used a retrospective cross-sectional survey design.

Wed, 04/07/2021 - 14:35

Preferences and Experiences of Muslim Patients and Their Families in Muslim-Majority Countries for End-of-Life Care: A Systematic Review and Thematic

Background. Care for people with progressive illness should be person centered and account for their cultural values and spiritual beliefs. There are an estimated 1.7 billion Muslims worldwide, largely living in low-income and middle-income countries. Aims. This study aimed to identify, appraise, and integrate the evidence for the experiences and preferences of Muslim patients and/or families for end-of-life care in Muslim-majority countries. Design. Systematic review. Data sources.

Tue, 04/06/2021 - 14:47

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