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Family carers

Factors associated with the quality of life of family carers of people with dementia: A systematic review

Introduction Family carers of people with dementia are their most important support in practical, personal, and economic terms. Carers are vital to maintaining the quality of life (QOL) of people with dementia. This review aims to identify factors related to the QOL of family carers of people with dementia. Methods Searches on terms including “carers,” “dementia,” “family,” and “quality of life” in research databases. Findings were synthesized inductively, grouping factors associated with carer QOL into themes.

Mon, 03/11/2019 - 09:32

A person‐centred approach to family carer needs assessment and support in dementia community care in Western Australia

This feasibility study aimed to identify and address the support needs of family carers (FCs) of people living with dementia and to assess whether the use of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention in home‐based care was acceptable and relevant to FCs. The CSNAT intervention comprised two FC support needs assessment visits, 7 weeks apart, plus associated actions addressing prioritised needs by the Client Care Advisors of a community care service in Western Australia in 2015.

Fri, 08/24/2018 - 12:51

Family carers' experiences of receiving the news of a diagnosis of Motor Neurone Disease: A national survey

Family carers have a central role in the care and support of people with MND and face the challenges of the disease from diagnosis to progression and the multiple losses of MND, but their support needs are often neglected. This study aimed to investigate the experiences of family carers at the time of diagnosis and their satisfaction with receiving the news. An anonymous postal survey was facilitated by all MND Associations in Australia (2014) and 190 family carers completed the questionnaire. The questions centred on the SPIKES protocol for communicating bad news.

Fri, 08/24/2018 - 12:45

The carer-related knowledge exchange network (CAREN): enhancing the relationship between research and evidence and policy and practice

Although there is now an extensive international body of research and evidence about care and carers it is fragmented and disparate. Without synthesis, organisation and accessibility it cannot effectively inform and improve policy and practice with carers. This paper makes the case for an accessible carer-related research and evidence resource for stakeholders in carer-related domains across policy, practice, research to address this systemic deficit in the carers field. The Carer-related Knowledge Exchange Network (CAREN) has recently been established in recognition of this case.

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 13:36

Physical and psychological health of family carers co‐residing with an adult relative with an intellectual disability

Background: Providing long‐term care to an adult relative with intellectual disability can impact negatively on caregivers’ health and well‐being. Methods: Data were collected via online and postal questionnaires on 110 family carers’ physical and psychological health, family stress and perceived positive gains from caring. Psychological adaptation and carers’ satisfaction with available support were also examined. Results: Study participants reported more health problems than general populations.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 12:32

Between worlds: the experiences and needs of former family carers

While the financial, physical and psycho-social burden for caregivers is recorded, less is known about the post-caring experience. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the experiences and needs of Irish former family carers in the post-caring/care transitions period. Former family carers were defined as family members who provided physical and/or social care to a family member with an illness or disability in the home for at least 6 months prior to nursing home/hospice placement or death.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Support for family carers of children and young people with developmental disabilities and challenging behaviour: what stops it being helpful?

Background  Many family carers find the support they receive in respect of their child's challenging behaviour unhelpful. This study sought to identify carer perceptions of the ways in which support is unhelpful and how it could be more helpful.

Methods  Thirteen mothers, caring for a child with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour, were interviewed. Parental perceptions and concerns regarding support received were investigated. Transcribed interviews were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

An interpretive phenomenological account of the experiences of family carers of the elderly

Research on family caregiving has focused on the quantitative as opposed to the qualitative investigation of the impact of caregiving on the health and psychological well-being of family carers. In this study, interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) was used to explore the subjective experience, needs and appraisals from the perspectives of family carers of older adults. Six family carers were recruited from a carer support group; one male and five female primary carers to an elderly family member with age or disease-related impairment.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

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