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Family carers

Variances in family carers' quality of life based on selected relationship and caregiving indicators: A quantitative secondary analysis

Aims and objectives: To determine subgroups of family carers based on family relational and caregiving variables and to explore group differences in relation to selected carer outcomes. Background: Family caregiving in later life holds a myriad of positive and negative outcomes for family members' well‐being. However, factors that constitute family carers' experience and explain variances are less well understood.

Thu, 03/28/2019 - 13:06

P77 Levels of psychological distress and predictors of distress in family carers of patients with cancer at end of life

Background Family carers provide substantial support for patients at end-of-life. It is important to understand how caregiving impacts on carers to guide appropriate interventions to improve carer wellbeing.  The aims of this study were to investigate levels of psychological distress and predictors of distress during end of life care giving in a national sample of family carers of people with cancer. Methods Four-month post-bereavement postal survey of a national census sample of relatives reporting a death from cancer 1–16th May 2015.

Mon, 03/25/2019 - 12:51

Supporting the critical role of family carers in wellness management

Aging populations, the increased prevalence of chronic disease, and spiraling healthcare costs have led to calls for policy and technology that focuses on wellness management, preventative interventions, and decentralized healthcare. This has prompted several initiatives aimed at empowering individuals to proactively manage their wellness, including employee wellness programmes, step-tracking mobile apps, etc. However, a critical actor in this proposed new healthcare model is the family carer.

Mon, 03/25/2019 - 12:42

Role of the Admiral Nurse in supporting a person with dementia and their family carer

Distress is commonly experienced by those caring for someone with dementia, and can occur whether the carer is living with a person with dementia, or supporting a person with dementia who lives alone to maintain their independence. It is essential for health and social care professionals to support family carers to balance their needs with those of the person they care for. However, this might be challenging because many influencing factors can affect these needs, and identifying the needs of the family carer and balancing them with the needs of the person with dementia is often complex.

Mon, 03/25/2019 - 12:32

Achieving positive outcomes in complex cases: The Admiral Nurse Dementia Helpline (Innovative Practice)

Carer distress is an all too common factor in caring for someone with dementia, whether living with the person with dementia, or trying to maintain their independence when they are living alone. Providing support for families on many day-to-day issues with immediacy as and when they arise can be very difficult to achieve for services on the ground as carer need can be difficult to anticipate as well as the changing status of the person with dementia.

Mon, 03/25/2019 - 11:31

Factors associated with the quality of life of family carers of people with dementia: A systematic review

Introduction Family carers of people with dementia are their most important support in practical, personal, and economic terms. Carers are vital to maintaining the quality of life (QOL) of people with dementia. This review aims to identify factors related to the QOL of family carers of people with dementia. Methods Searches on terms including “carers,” “dementia,” “family,” and “quality of life” in research databases. Findings were synthesized inductively, grouping factors associated with carer QOL into themes.

Mon, 03/11/2019 - 09:32

A person‐centred approach to family carer needs assessment and support in dementia community care in Western Australia

This feasibility study aimed to identify and address the support needs of family carers (FCs) of people living with dementia and to assess whether the use of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention in home‐based care was acceptable and relevant to FCs. The CSNAT intervention comprised two FC support needs assessment visits, 7 weeks apart, plus associated actions addressing prioritised needs by the Client Care Advisors of a community care service in Western Australia in 2015.

Fri, 08/24/2018 - 12:51

Family carers' experiences of receiving the news of a diagnosis of Motor Neurone Disease: A national survey

Family carers have a central role in the care and support of people with MND and face the challenges of the disease from diagnosis to progression and the multiple losses of MND, but their support needs are often neglected. This study aimed to investigate the experiences of family carers at the time of diagnosis and their satisfaction with receiving the news. An anonymous postal survey was facilitated by all MND Associations in Australia (2014) and 190 family carers completed the questionnaire. The questions centred on the SPIKES protocol for communicating bad news.

Fri, 08/24/2018 - 12:45

The carer-related knowledge exchange network (CAREN): enhancing the relationship between research and evidence and policy and practice

Although there is now an extensive international body of research and evidence about care and carers it is fragmented and disparate. Without synthesis, organisation and accessibility it cannot effectively inform and improve policy and practice with carers. This paper makes the case for an accessible carer-related research and evidence resource for stakeholders in carer-related domains across policy, practice, research to address this systemic deficit in the carers field. The Carer-related Knowledge Exchange Network (CAREN) has recently been established in recognition of this case.

Thu, 08/16/2018 - 13:36

Physical and psychological health of family carers co‐residing with an adult relative with an intellectual disability

Background: Providing long‐term care to an adult relative with intellectual disability can impact negatively on caregivers’ health and well‐being. Methods: Data were collected via online and postal questionnaires on 110 family carers’ physical and psychological health, family stress and perceived positive gains from caring. Psychological adaptation and carers’ satisfaction with available support were also examined. Results: Study participants reported more health problems than general populations.

Wed, 06/06/2018 - 12:32