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Fear

The fear of falls in the caregivers of institutionalized elders

Aims: To understand how the fear of falls emerges and manifests itself in caregivers of institutionalized elders. Methods: It is a qualitative study, based on the Grounded Theory and carried out with 24 informal caregivers, 5 nurses, 2 physicians and 2 directors of two Portuguese nursing homes. Data collection took place through interviews, participant observation, and documentation analysis, between October 2016 and January 2018. Data was collected and analyzed simultaneously, following the stages of open, axial, and selective coding.

Mon, 05/30/2022 - 18:31

Experiences of fear in hospital settings from the perspectives of mental health service users and informal caregivers

Introduction: In the literature, service users and informal caregivers have been critical towards psychiatric inpatient care. However, little is known about their fears related to hospital care. Objectives: We describe service users’ and informal caregivers’ experiences of fear in psychiatric hospital settings. Methods: The data were collected from seven mental health associations located in six Finnish cities.

Mon, 02/28/2022 - 10:46

Symptoms of mood disorders in family carers of older people with dementia who experience caregiver burden: a network approach

Background informal carers of people with dementia are at greater risk of anxiety and depressive disorders if they find caregiving to be a burden. The aim of this study was to use a network analysis of cross-sectional data to investigate the relationships between anxiety and depressive symptoms in family carers of older people with dementia who experience burden. Methods sixty family carers exhibiting high levels of burden using the Zarit Burden Interview were included in the study. Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

Thu, 01/14/2021 - 12:51

Spirituality among family caregivers in palliative care: an integrative literature review

Background: Family caregivers experience spiritual and existential concerns while caring for their terminally ill family members. Aim: To evaluate and synthesise studies on spirituality among family caregivers in palliative care. Design: An integrative literature review of peer-reviewed articles published between 2000 and 2016. Sample: Participants were family caregivers (parents, spouses, relatives or friends) caring for an adult (age>18 years) family member with a terminal illness in a palliative care setting.

Wed, 10/24/2018 - 10:31

We're all in it together: supporting young carers and their families in Australia

Although recent initiatives in Australia have attempted to respond to the needs of children and young people with care responsibilities, many continue to be unable to access responsive supports. A qualitative, exploratory study was conducted to identify the current needs and barriers to services for young carers and their families in Canberra, Australia. This paper focuses on a range of family, service and systems level issues that impede young carers' access to services.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

An emotive subject: insights from social, voluntary and healthcare professionals into the feelings of family carers for people with mental health problems

Caring for people with mental health problems can generate a whole range of positive and negative emotions, including fear, disbelief, guilt and chaos as well as a sense of purpose, pride and achievement. This paper explores the emotions of family carers from the perspectives of social, voluntary and healthcare professionals. Sixty-five participants were interviewed, the sample included directors, managers and senior staff from social, voluntary and healthcare organisations. Participants were encouraged to talk in detail about their understanding of the emotions of family carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Invisible children: young carers of parents with mental health problems - the perspectives of professionals

This study explored professional views about the needs of young carers of adults with mental health problems. Sixty five participants were interviewed and included professionals from the health, social care and voluntary sectors. Respondents were asked to comment on their understanding of the needs of young carers and appropriate methods or interventions to address these needs. Findings include: young carers'perceived isolation, restricted opportunities and stigma; fears involving child protection and family separation; and examples of good professional practice upon which to build.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08