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FILIAL piety

Changing Shapes of Care: Expressions of Filial Piety among Second-generation Chinese in the Netherlands

This study explored perceptions of filial care among second-generation Chinese immigrants in the Netherlands. The provision of filial help or care can be regarded as a cultural phenomenon known as filial piety and it can be considered within the broad scope of caregiving as "family care". Fifteen interviews were conducted, and a thematic analysis was applied. The findings showed that care was given in the form of language brokering, information inquiry, home visits, and facilitative and social support.

Mon, 11/23/2020 - 14:47

Psychological well-being of Chinese Immigrant adult-child caregivers: how do filial expectation, self-rated filial performance, and filial discrepancy matter?

Background: Given the importance of ethnic culture in family caregiving and recent Chinese immigrant population growth, this study explored effects of multiple filial piety traits-filial expectation, self-rated filial performance, and filial discrepancy-on psychological well-being of Chinese immigrants who care for older parents (adult-child caregivers) in the United States. Methods: This study used cross-sectional data from 393 Chinese immigrant adult-child caregivers in the Greater Chicago area from the 2012-2014 Piety study.

Thu, 07/30/2020 - 14:34

Vietnamese Adult-Child and Spousal Caregivers of Older Adults in Houston, Texas: Results from the Vietnamese Aging and Care Survey (VACS)

Vietnamese are the largest Asian ethnic group in Houston, Texas; however, research on this population is scarce. To address this dearth of knowledge, we developed the Vietnamese Aging and Care Survey. The objective of the study was to explore the sociodemographic and health characteristics of Vietnamese adults aged 65 years and older (n = 132) and their family caregivers (n = 64). Adult-child caregivers (n = 41) were aged between 21 and 65 years old. The majority were married, working, female, and in good to excellent health.

Wed, 02/26/2020 - 15:25

What is the meaning of filial piety for people with dementia and their family caregivers in China under the current social transitions? An interpretative phenomenological analysis

The filial piety model of family centred care has dominated Chinese society for thousands of years. The ways in which filial piety is presented are being modified and modernised as China undergoes social transitions. The study aims to understand the meaning of filial piety for people with dementia and family caregivers. Semi-structured interviews with people with dementia (n = 10) and family caregivers (n = 14) were conducted. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three themes emerged: (a) ‘Being filial is a cultural continuity and my future investment’.

Wed, 10/23/2019 - 16:45

Filial piety as a protective factor against burden experienced by family caregivers of diabetic patients in Hong Kong

The quality of parent-child relationships would affect adult children’s attitudes and behaviors toward caring for their ill-parents. Perhaps, this is peculiarly true for Chinese societies where the traditional value of filial piety is emphasized. This study aimed to investigate how filial piety might bear on care burden experienced by Chinese family caregivers of people with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in Hong Kong.

Thu, 05/30/2019 - 15:53

Effects of filial piety in the experiences of informal caregivers

Informal caregivers are the family members and friends who provide help and support daily to individuals who are temporarily or permanently unable to function independently. They have to engage in a range of activities. They have a long term commitment to the persons they are helping and are usually not paid for their efforts. In certain Asian cultures, there is a peculiar concept that seems to be playing a great role in aiding people to adhere to their responsibility and derive satisfaction from their role of caregiving. This is known as filial piety.

Wed, 10/24/2018 - 09:40