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Guilt

Making Decisions About Long-Term Institutional Care Placement Among People With Dementia and Their Caregivers: Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: People with dementia become increasingly dependent on others for care as cognition declines. Decision making about placement of people with dementia into long-term institutional care can be emotionally complex. The objective of this review is to describe experiences and perspectives of people with dementia and their family caregivers in making decisions about institutional care placement. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched from inception to August 2018. Thematic synthesis was used to analyze results.

Tue, 08/11/2020 - 12:54

Separation characterized by responsibility and guilt: Family caregivers’ experiences with palliative care for a close family member with severe dementia in long-term care facilities

Aim and objectives: The aim of this study was to explore family caregivers’ experiences with palliative care for a close family member with severe dementia in long-term care facilities. Background: Dementia not only affects individuals but also affects and changes the lives of close family members. An increasing number of dementia-related deaths occur in long-term care facilities; therefore, it is critical to understand how healthcare professionals support and care for residents with dementia and their families at the end of life.

Wed, 02/26/2020 - 12:47

Exploring therapeutic interventions to reduce the experience of guilt in carers of people living with dementia

Family carers of people with dementia often describe feelings of guilt, grief and low mood, and are also at increased risk of clinical depression. Through a skilled assessment of a carer’s feelings of guilt, an Admiral Nurse identified specific psychological approaches helpful in relieving this potentially damaging and paralysing phenomenon.

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 14:21

How much care is enough? carer's guilt and Bergsonian time

Despite devoting their time to another person's needs, many carers paradoxically experience guilt during their caregiving tenure concerning whether they are providing enough care. When discussing the "enough" of anything, what is at stake is that thing's quantification. Given that there are seemingly no quantifiable units of care by which to measure the role, concerns regarding whether enough care is being provided often focus on what constitutes enough time as a carer. In exploring this aspect of the carer's experience, two key parameters emerge; (1) guilt, and, (2) quantified time.

Tue, 05/14/2019 - 13:49

An emotive subject: insights from social, voluntary and healthcare professionals into the feelings of family carers for people with mental health problems

Caring for people with mental health problems can generate a whole range of positive and negative emotions, including fear, disbelief, guilt and chaos as well as a sense of purpose, pride and achievement. This paper explores the emotions of family carers from the perspectives of social, voluntary and healthcare professionals. Sixty-five participants were interviewed, the sample included directors, managers and senior staff from social, voluntary and healthcare organisations. Participants were encouraged to talk in detail about their understanding of the emotions of family carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10