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Distress relief

Reports on research from the Social Policy Research Unit (SPRU) designed to measure and monitor health inequalities between carers and noncarers. The study used data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) covering the period from 1991 to 2000. Results found that emotional and mental health problems are more often associated with caregiving than physical health problems

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Informal care, health and mortality

Informal care provision is an activity in which individuals are increasingly likely to become involved across their life course, and particularly in later life, as a result of demographic changes such as increasing longevity and changes in co-residential living arrangements in later life. Academic research so far has highlighted the adverse impact of informal care provision on the financial position of the carer, however, the evidence on the impact of informal care provision on the carer's physical, mental and emotional health, and on their mortality, presents a more complex picture.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Social problem-solving abilities and distress among family members assuming a caregiving role

We examined the relation of social problem-solving abilities to distress experienced by family members assuming a caregiving role for a loved one who had recently incurred a severe physical disability. Family members completed measures of problem-solving, depression and health, while their loved one participated in an inpatient rehabilitation programme. Correlational analyses indicated that a negative problem orientation was significantly predictive of caregiver distress, regardless of the degree of physical impairment of the care recipient.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Is There a Trade-off Between Parent Care and Self-care?

Caregiving for family members is often described as a 36-hour day. Previous literature has suggested that family caregivers have little time to attend to their own health needs, such as participating in leisure-time physical activity. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, we analyze whether time-allocation decisions reflect a conflict between time devoted to informal care and time devoted to self-health promotion through physical activity.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Sam's Bill

Reports on what the proposed legislation Carers (Equal Opportunities) Bill, will mean for the provision of services to carers. It aims to provide carers who end their caring role with information on opportunities for education, training and employment.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Caring, employment and health among adults of working age: evidence from Britain and Belgium

Background: For those of working age, results are inconclusive when exploring the health impact of providing care. Moreover, population data is lacking and the impact of welfare policies on the caregivers’ health has not been yet analysed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Pre-menstrual syndrome in women with Down Syndrome

Background  Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers.

Method  A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was adapted. Following its validation, the diary was completed by 33 women with Down syndrome, then adapted, and completed by a further 32 women with Down syndrome/carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Impacts of Informal Caregiving on Caregiver Employment, Health, and Family

As the aging population increases, the demand for informal caregiving is becoming an ever more important concern for researchers and policy-makers alike. To shed light on the implications of informal caregiving, this paper reviews current research on its impact on three areas of caregivers’ lives: employment, health, and family. Because the literature is inherently interdisciplinary, the research designs, sampling procedures, and statistical methods used are heterogeneous.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Formal support of stroke survivors and their informal carers in the community: a cohort study

This cohort study, aims to explore formal care provision to stroke survivors and their informal carers in the community in the UK. An initial cohort of 105 cohabitant carers of first-time stroke patients was recruited while the stroke patient was in hospital. Structured face-to-face interviews were carried out with carers prior to discharge of the stroke patient home, at 6 weeks after discharge, and 15 months after stroke.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

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