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Caregiver mental health and HIV-infected child wellness: perspectives from Ugandan caregivers

Prior studies indicate a substantial link between maternal depression and early child health but give limited consideration to the direction of this relationship or the context in which it occurs. We sought to create a contextually informed conceptual framework of this relationship through semi-structured interviews with women that had lived experience of caring for an HIV-infected child while coping with depression and anxiety symptoms. Caregivers explained their role in raising healthy children as complex and complicated by poverty, stigma, and isolation.

Mon, 01/16/2023 - 14:03

Enablers of adherence to clinic appointments for children attending an antiretroviral clinic in Northern Nigeria: Perspectives of caregivers and care providers

Background: Nigeria has the highest burden of paediatric HIV infection, and the success of control efforts in the country is crucial to the global control of the HIV epidemic. However, defaults from schedules of care pose a threat to paediatric HIV control in Nigeria. This study was conducted in a pioneer facility for the implementation of the National HIV Prevention and Treatment Programmes.

Mon, 01/16/2023 - 14:01

Discordant retention of HIV-infected mothers and children: Evidence for a family-based approach from Southern Mozambique

It is often assumed that children and their caregivers either stay in care together or discontinue together, but data is lacking on caregiver-child retention concordance. We sought to describe the pattern of care among a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected children and mothers enrolled in care at the Manhiça District Hospital (MDH).This was a retrospective review of routine HIV clinical data collected under a larger prospective HIV cohort study at MDH.

Mon, 01/16/2023 - 12:52

The power of siblings and caregivers: under-explored types of social support among children affected by HIV and AIDS

Children affected by HIV and AIDS have significantly higher rates of mental health problems than unaffected children. There is a need for research to examine how social support functions as a source of resiliency for children in high HIV-prevalence settings such as South Africa. The purpose of this research was to explore how family social support relates to depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress (PTS).

Thu, 01/05/2023 - 18:08

Stigma and discrimination: barriers to the utilisation of a nutritional program in HIV care services in the Tigray region, Ethiopia

Background: In Ethiopia, stigmatising attitudes towards people living with HIV have reduced over time. This is mainly due to improved HIV knowledge and the expansion of access to HIV care and support services. However, HIV stigma and discrimination remain a key challenge and have negative impacts on access to and utilisation of HIV services including nutritional programs in the HIV care setting. A small number of studies have examined the experience of stigma related to nutritional programs, but this is limited.

Tue, 12/20/2022 - 16:54

The Multilevel Relationships of HIV-Related Stigma to Child and Caregiver Mental Health among HIV-Affected Households in South Africa

HIV/AIDS-related (HAR) stigma is still a prevalent problem in Sub-Saharan Africa, and has been found to be related to mental health of HIV-positive individuals. However, no studies in the Sub-Saharan African context have yet examined the relationship between HAR stigma and mental health among HIV-negative, HIV-affected adults and families; nor have any studies in this context yet examined stigma as an ecological construct predicting mental health outcomes through supra-individual (setting level) and individual levels of influence.

Tue, 12/13/2022 - 15:45

A randomized controlled trial evaluating the effects of a family-centered HIV care model on viral suppression and retention in care of HIV-positive children in Eswatini

Introduction: A family-centered care model (FCCM) providing family-based HIV services, rather than separate adult/pediatric services, has been proposed to increase pediatric retention and treatment adherence. Materials and methods: Eight health-care facilities in the Hhohho region of Eswatini were randomized to implement FCCM (n = 4) or continue standard-of-care (SOC) separate adult/pediatric clinics (n = 4).

Fri, 06/17/2022 - 17:21

Older Caregivers With HIV: An Unrecognized Gap in the Literature

Background: Although the number of older people living with HIV (PLWH) is growing, prior research has focused on older PLWH as care recipients and psychosocial factors (e.g., stigma, social support) associated with their HIV care. Literature on HIV caregiving mainly focuses on family members providing care to PLWH or children of parents with HIV. There is a gap in the literature in terms of older PLWH's roles as caregivers to their family members.

Thu, 06/09/2022 - 13:11

"I Wish I Could Die So I Would Not Be in Pain": A Qualitative Study of Palliative Care Needs Among People With Cancer or HIV/AIDS in Vietnam and Their Caregivers

Background: Although cancer and HIV/AIDS are common causes of death in Vietnam, limited data exist on their palliative care needs. As palliative care becomes part of Universal Health Coverage, evidence is needed to scale up appropriate care. Objectives: To elicit from people with cancer or HIV/AIDS in Vietnam, and their caregivers, the specific multidimensional symptoms and concerns that cause serious health-related suffering.

Sun, 06/05/2022 - 13:14

"He was no longer listening to me": A qualitative study in six Sub-Saharan African countries exploring next-of-kin perspectives on caring following the death of a relative from AIDS

In the era of widespread antiretroviral therapy, few studies have explored the perspectives of the relatives involved in caring for people living with HIV (PLHIV) during periods of ill-health leading up to their demise. In this analysis, we explore the process of care for PLHIV as their death approached, from their relatives' perspective. We apply Tronto's care ethics framework that distinguishes between care-receiving among PLHIV on the one hand, and caring about, caring for and care-giving by their relatives on the other.

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 14:31

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