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Invisible children: young carers of parents with mental health problems - the perspectives of professionals

This study explored professional views about the needs of young carers of adults with mental health problems. Sixty five participants were interviewed and included professionals from the health, social care and voluntary sectors. Respondents were asked to comment on their understanding of the needs of young carers and appropriate methods or interventions to address these needs. Findings include: young carers'perceived isolation, restricted opportunities and stigma; fears involving child protection and family separation; and examples of good professional practice upon which to build.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

Caring for older adults: the benefits of informal family caregiving

Recent literature emphasizes the burdens of caregiving, but there has been limited focus on benefits accrued by family members who care for older adults. This article describes phase three of a research study of employed caregivers in the workplace. Phase three of the study was a caregiver support group. Data from the support group meetings were content analyzed and interpreted using a lifespan perspective.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

Older people and falls: health status, quality of life, lifestyle, care networks, prevention and views on service use following a recent fall

Aim and objective.  This study has investigated older people’s experiences of a recent fall, its impact on their health, lifestyle, quality of life, care networks, prevention and their views on service use.

Background.  Falls are common in older people and prevalence increases with age. Falls prevention is a major policy and service initiative.

Design.  An exploratory, qualitative design involving two time points.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

Young carers and end of life services

In 2009, the NHS National Centre for Involvement and Liverpool Primary Care Trust undertook a national pilot project to establish how best to undertake patient and public involvement in respect of end of life (EOL) services. This article describes the outcomes from its sub-project which focused on young carers. It is projected that there are substantial numbers of young carers in the UK, at any one point in time, supporting their (grand)parents, or other adult family members, during their terminal illness.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

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