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Income

Caregiver Burden, Quality of Life and Related Factors in Family Caregivers of Dementia Patients in Turkey

This study aimed to evaluate caregiver burden and quality of life (QoL) and their predictors in family caregivers of dementia patients. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was carried out with a sample of 102 patients and their family caregivers. The Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI) and Short Form-12 (SF-12) were used to collect data. CBI mean score was 37.97 ± 21.30. Mean scores of SF-12 sub-domains varied between 36.02 and 77.94 and were significantly lower as compared to normative means of the general population, excluding only the physical health subdomain.

Mon, 11/23/2020 - 12:03

Scotland's Progressive Rhetoric: Devolution and Carer's Allowance

The Scotland Act 2016 devolved powers over eleven social security benefits (including Carer's Allowance) providing Scotland with some, albeit limited, opportunity to differentiate itself in terms of welfare policy progressivity. The Carers (Scotland) Act 2016 set out the strategy for supporting those who limit their employment or educational enrolment due to the responsibility of caring for an adult or child with a health condition.

Wed, 02/26/2020 - 12:40

Availability of informal caregivers for palliative care patients with cancer: Is there a difference between higher- and lower-income settings

Objective: Family caregivers are the default caring personnel for terminal cancer patients. The characteristics, demographics, distribution, psychological burden, and socioeconomic standards differ between high- and low-income countries. We aimed to assess those factors and their direct reflection on both the patient and the caregiver. Patients and Methods: This is a comparative cross-sectional study for terminal cancer patients in the palliative care unit between the United Kingdom (UK) as a high-income community and Egypt as a low-income community.

Mon, 09/30/2019 - 11:32

Making Ends Meet (or Not): How Public Policy Affects Caregivers' Income

Federal policies present roadblocks to caregivers, especially to their financial security. Federal Medicaid law limits payments for spousal caregiving and the Family and Medical Leave Act only provides for unpaid leave. The Social Security Administration gives no work credits for persons providing free caregiving. Federal Medicaid law requires all caregiving be provided voluntarily, but many state Medicaid programs are not in compliance.

Thu, 05/30/2019 - 15:47

Who cares? The implications of informal care and work for policy makers and employers

Outlines some of the implications associated with the growing number of informal carers in the UK, the health and social care system's increasingly unsustainable reliance on them, and what Government and employers can do about it. The report is informed by the academic and grey literature, as well as views from a workshop attended by over 30 stakeholders from government and non-government bodies, individual carers, carers charities, think tanks, and businesses.

Fri, 04/12/2019 - 16:51

The complex relationship between household income of family caregivers, access to palliative care services and place of death: A national household population survey

Background: Previous work shows that more affluent patients with cancer are more likely to die at home, whereas those dying from non-cancer conditions are more likely to die in hospital. Family caregivers are an important factor in determining place of death. Aim: To investigate associations between family caregivers' household income, patients' access to specialist palliative care and place of patients' death, by level of personal end-of-life care. Design: A cross-sectional community household population survey.

Mon, 10/22/2018 - 13:43

Costs and consequences for the carers of people with dementia in Ireland

This study examines the economic and psychological costs of care for family carers of people with dementia in Ireland. The analysis is based on an opportunistic survey of 98 carers of people with dementia. The article presents new findings on Irish carers' own perceptions of optimal care provision and the value of the care provided in monetary terms. Family carers in the survey provide an average of just under 12 hours of specified care each day to people with dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Living wages and the ‘making work pay’ strategy

Poverty among workers is a perennial problem. Recently there has been much interest in the idea of living wages. As mechanisms to increase wages above the ‘poverty line’, living wages present an alternative to New Labour’s ‘making work pay’ strategy; a combination of minimum wage regulation and means-tested, in-work relief.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Financial well-being of US parents caring for coresident children and adults with developmental disabilities: An age cohort analysis*

Background Understanding how financial well-being changes through the life course of caregiving parents of children with developmental disabilities is critically important. Methods We analyse SIPP (U.S. Census Bureau) data to describe income poverty, asset poverty, income, net worth, and liquid assets of US parents ( N = 753) of children with developmental disabilities. Results Income and asset poverty was greatest for the youngest and oldest parents.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Informal care over time

The government’s strategy, Caring for carers, aims to support carers in their caring activities, sustain their other roles including paid employment, and improve their long-term financial security. This project explored these policy goals using existing data sets to inform service developments and the allocation of resources for supporting adult carers. The research also provides baseline findings at the national level which could be used to monitor the impact of the strategy and related policy initiatives.
Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

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