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Informal caregiving

Differences within Differences: Gender Inequalities in Caregiving Intensity Vary by Race and Ethnicity in Informal Caregivers

Among the 50+ million informal caregivers in the US, substantial gender, racial/ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in caregiving intensity are well-documented. However, those disparities may be more nuanced: gender disparities in caregiving intensity may vary by race/ethnicity (White, Black, and Hispanic) and socioeconomic status (SES).

Wed, 01/22/2020 - 16:30

Community and caregiver perceptions of giving care to seniors

Background: Family caregivers of seniors and disabled adults frequently bear the responsibility of aiding in instrumental activities of daily living and locating resources, often while raising their own families. As the demand for care rises, caregivers may experience declining physical health and increased social and emotional stress compared to their noncaregiving counterparts. This study aims to better understand the journey of unpaid family caregivers and identify opportunities for improvement across organizations, policies, systems, and teams.

Wed, 10/23/2019 - 15:57

Care Burden and Mental Ill Health in Spouses of People With Parkinson Disease Dementia and Lewy Body Dementia

Objectives: To explore and compare levels of mental health, care burden, and relationship satisfaction among caregiving spouses of people with mild cognitive impairment or dementia in Parkinson disease (PD-MCI or PDD) or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Methods: Spouses (n = 136) completed measures of mood, stress, resilience, general health, quality of life, care burden, and relationship satisfaction, as well as sociodemographic factors.

Wed, 09/25/2019 - 17:37

Sociodemographic Characteristics and Preferences for Family (Informal) and Formal Caregiver Help With ADLs

The purpose of this article was to compare sociodemographic characteristics and various care preferences for family and formal caregivers help with activities of daily living (ADLs). The sample was 56,337 noninstutionalized U.S. civilian adults, 40 to 65 years of age. This is a cross-sectional study using secondary data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)—2011 to 2014. Respondents’ sociodemographic characteristics and various care preferences for caregiver help with ADLs were analyzed.

Tue, 09/10/2019 - 15:39

Women Caring for Our Aging in Place Seniors Will Lose Out because of U.S. Immigration Policies

Most older people experiencing chronic health problems, physical disabilities, and memory losses are still able to age in place in their own homes. However, they often need help from others to enjoy healthy, active, and independent lives. They turn mostly to family members, mainly women and usually their daughters, daughters-in-law or wives. But caring for frail elders has become more demanding and complex, and these family members often feel physically and emotionally overwhelmed and burnt out. They concede that they cannot do it alone.

Tue, 09/10/2019 - 10:54

Living environment, social support, and informal caregiving are associated with healthcare seeking behaviour and adherence to medication treatment: A cross-sectional population study

Despite the well-known associations between local environment and health, few studies have focused on environment and healthcare utilisation, for instance healthcare seeking behaviour or adherence. This study was aimed at analysing housing type, behaviour based on perceived local outdoor safety, social support, informal caregiving, demographics, socioeconomics, and long-term illness, and associations with health-seeking and adherence behaviours at a population level.

Fri, 09/06/2019 - 17:02

Family Caregiving in Serious Illness in the United States: Recommendations to Support an Invisible Workforce

Family caregivers provide the vast majority of care for individuals with serious illness living in the community but are not often viewed as full members of the healthcare team. Family caregivers are increasingly expected to acquire a sophisticated understanding of the care recipient's condition and new skills to execute complex medical or nursing tasks, often without adequate preparation and support, and with little choice in taking on the role.

Fri, 09/06/2019 - 16:54

Ageism in informal care network members of older women

Objectives: Negative attitudes toward aging are common among formal healthcare providers, but have been infrequently assessed among informal caregivers providing assistance to older adults.

Tue, 07/02/2019 - 18:43

Foreign Domestic Workers and Eldercare in Singapore: Who Hires Them?

In Singapore, policy makers expect families to remain actively involved in the care of their frail older relatives, as manifestly expressed in its Many Helping Hands approach to long-term care. To enable families to fulfill this expectation, the government has enacted policies that encourage the hiring of foreign domestic workers (FDWs) to complement or supplement informal caregiving efforts. Using the Andersen Behavioral Model, we were interested in identifying caregiver and care receiver characteristics that might predict the hiring of FDWs.

Thu, 06/27/2019 - 16:01

Informal caregiving and diurnal patterns of salivary cortisol: Results from the Whitehall II cohort study

The objective was to investigate the relationship between various aspects of informal caregiving and diurnal patterns of salivary cortisol, with special attention to the moderating effect of sex and work status. The study population was composed of 3727 men and women from the British Whitehall II study. Salivary cortisol was measured six times during a weekday. Aspects of caregiving included the relationship of caregiver to recipient, weekly hours of caregiving, and length of caregiving.

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 12:24