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Interpersonal relations

How caring for a parent affects the psychosocial development of the young

Aim To investigate the impact of caring for a parent on the psychosocial development of the young person. Methods A total of 20 young carers and 20 non-caregiving peers, aged 11-18 years, were compared on self-report measures of life satisfaction, self-esteem, and behavioural strengths and difficulties. Parental reports on their child's behaviour were obtained and measured. Results Young carers reported lower life satisfaction and self-esteem compared with non-caregiving peers, and their parents rated them as having more difficulties with peer relationships and more emotional symptoms.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

The pressures felt by informal carers of people with dementia

Caring for people with dementia is complex and demanding, and informal carers carry out much of the care. In this article, Madeline Armstrong outlines the different types of dementia and discusses the psychological approaches to care. Informal carers experience many stressors when caring for people with dementia and Admiral nurses play an important role in supporting carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

'Sustaining Place' - a grounded theory of how informal carers of people with dementia manage alterations to relationships within their social worlds

Aims and objectives: This paper presents a theory explaining the processes used by informal carers of people with dementia to mange alterations to their, and people with dementias' relationships with and places within their social worlds.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

The impact of caring for adults with intellectual disability on the quality of life of parents

Background Because of an increase in life expectancy and de-institutionalisation, many adults with intellectual disability (ID) live with and are cared for by their parents throughout their adult lives. Because of caring demands, the quality of life (QOL) of parents may be affected. The study explored the impact of caring for an adult with ID on the QOL of parents. Methods Participants were 12 parents who were the full-time carers of an adult with ID. Participants were interviewed about the effect of caring on their QOL.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Two sides of the same coin: caring for a person with bipolar disorder

The aim of this paper was to gain an in-depth understanding of the way the lives of individuals supporting someone diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder is a severe, recurrent and chronic mental disorder that has a significant impact on the lives of those who experience it and the people supporting them. It is often the subsyndromal symptoms that cause major impairment in functioning and can have financial, social, interpersonal and health impacts for carers. A qualitative thematic analysis was chosen to enable an in-depth exploration of participants' experiences.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Emotional reactions and practical problems of the caregivers of hemodialysed patients

BACKGROUND: The international literature consistently shows that the psychosocial outcomes of the informal carers (caregivers) of chronically ill patients are influenced by factors such as personality traits and perceived social support, but few studies have investigated these variables in the caregivers of hemodialysed patients, and the reciprocal experience of chronicity.; METHODS: Fifty hemodialysed patients and their principal caregivers were recruited.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Carers' perceptions of pain in people with dementia: a grounded theory approach

The purpose of this Grounded Theory based study was to add to the limited understanding about the perception and observation of pain by the formal and informal carers of people with dementia. Thirty-one carers talked about how they know when their person with dementia has pain. Findings showed there is no one set of signs or behaviours that indicate pain in all people with dementia. However, a common pain assessment process amongst carers involved being able to detect deviation from normal behaviours based upon their intimate knowledge of what is normal for their person.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Growing and gaining through caring for a loved one with dementia

Aim: To investigate the gains experienced by family caregivers of persons with dementia. Methods: Twelve respondents were recruited using purposive sampling from three institutions around Singapore. A qualitative design, guided by the grounded theory approach, was adopted and involved semi-structured, in-depth, face-to-face interviews. The interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using open, axial and selective coding. Results: All caregivers interviewed reported having gained from caregiving.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Informal care as relationship: the case of the Magnificent Seven

Continual and/or repetitive informal caring and the part childhood, developmental and socially constructed identity play roles in adult informal care, form the background to the questions of why individuals gravitate toward such relationships and why they often continue to care in the face of overwhelming obstacles. A synthesis of the literature is presented, leading to personal histories as a method of discovery. The Biographic Narrative Interpretive Method’s minimalist interview technique is put forth as the key data-gathering event.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Whatever it takes: informal caregiving dynamics in blood and marrow transplantation

Purpose/Objectives: To describe the dynamics of commitment, expectations, and negotiation from the perspective of caregivers of patients undergoing blood and marrow transplantation (BMT).

Research Approach: Descriptive, exploratory, qualitative methodology. Setting: Comprehensive cancer center in a major southern U.S. city. Participants: 40 caregivers of patients undergoing BMT.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09