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Labour force participation

Informal caring for back pain: overlooked costs of back pain and projections to 2030

This study models the economic costs of informal caring for people with back pain, using a microsimulation model, Care&WorkMOD, from 2015 to 2030. Care&WorkMOD was based on 3 national Australian Surveys of Disability, Ageing and Carers (2003, 2009, 2012) data sets for individuals aged 15 to 64 years. Estimated national income loss due to caring for people with back pain was AU$258 million in 2015, increasing to $398 million in 2030 (54% increase).

Tue, 08/04/2020 - 15:59

The dynamics of social care and employment in mid-life

This study investigates the relationship between the provision of informal care to older parents/parents-in-law and the employment status of adult children in mid-life. The study analyses unique panel data for a cohort of individuals born in 1958 in Britain, focusing on respondents at risk of providing care (i.e. with at least one surviving parent/parent-in-law) and in employment at 50.

Wed, 10/09/2019 - 11:59

The relationship between elder care-giving and labour force participation in the context of policies addressing population ageing: A review of empirical studies published between 2006 and 2016

This paper systematically reviews empirical research published between 2006 and 2016 on the relationship between informal care-giving to elders and labour force participation (LFP). It does so in the context of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development policy responses to population ageing. In this context, conclusions regarding the LFP and care-giving relationship should at least be applicable to the sub-population of working-aged individuals who are most likely to provide informal elder care.

Wed, 09/11/2019 - 12:49

Shadow Times: The Temporal and Spatial Frameworks and Experiences of Caring and Working

In this article we explore temporal and spatial frameworks for analysing the experience of combining caring for children with participation in paid work. We highlight the pressure to undertake paid employment routinely, which places particular strains upon people who are most likely to have to combine caring and working. The authors assert that mothers continue to have the main responsibility for the organization, if not the conduct, of caring work (Sevenhuijsen, 1998).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

The effect of unpaid caregiving intensity on labour force participation: Results from a multinomial endogenous treatment model

It is well acknowledged that the intensity of caregiving affects the labour force participation of caregivers. The literature so far has not, however, been able to control effectively for the endogeneity of caregiving intensity. This paper contributes by dealing with the endogeneity of unpaid caregiving intensity when examining its impact on the labour force participation of caregivers. We distinguish between care provided to people who cohabit with the care recipient and care provided to recipients who reside elsewhere, as well as between primary and secondary caring roles.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Unpaid caregiving and paid work over life-courses: Different pathways, diverging outcomes

We investigate the extent to which people's earlier circumstances and experiences shape subsequent life-courses. We do this using UK longitudinal data to provide a dynamic analysis of employment and caregiving histories for 4339 people over 15–20 years between 1991 and 2010. We analyse these histories as sequences using optimal matching and cluster analysis to identify five distinct employment-caregiving pathways. Regression analysis shows that prior to embarking on these pathways, people are already differentiated by life-stage, gender and attitudes towards family and gender roles.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11