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Long-term care of the sick

Chapter 2: THE SUPPORT OF CARERS AND THEIR ORGANIZATIONS IN SOME NORTHERN AND WESTERN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

Chapter 2 of the book "Key Policy Issues in Long-Term Care" is presented. It explores the support of carers and the carers' organizations in certain countries in northern and western Europe. It looks into the carers' support that is given in the said countries and views the development of the new policy initiatives carers in the Netherlands. It is stated that carers' organization plays an important role in the formation of carers' policy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Categories and their consequences: Understanding and supporting the caring relationships of older lesbian, gay and bisexual people

This article advocates incorporating biographical narratives into social work practice involving older lesbian, gay and bisexual service users. Offering a critique of ‘sexuality-blind’ conditions in current policy and practice, the discussion draws on qualitative data to illustrate the potential benefits of narrative approaches for both practitioners and service users.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Informal Caregivers and the Risk of Nursing Home Admission Among Individuals Enrolled in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly

PURPOSE: We sought to determine whether participants in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) with an informal caregiver have a higher or lower risk of nursing home admission than those without caregivers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

The role of telemonitoring in caring for older people with long-term conditions

Long-term conditions have a negative effect on the lives of older people and those who care for them. As the population ages, so the prevalence of long-term conditions increases, which presents substantial challenges to providers of health and social care. This article examines how telemonitoring could help to meet some of these challenges. Telemonitoring involves patients at home recording vital signs, for example, blood pressure and pulse, and transmitting this information electronically to nurses based elsewhere.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10