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Mental health services

Support needs of family caregivers of people who experience mental illness and the role of mental health services

Family caregivers are an irreplaceable resource for the mental health services system and the pillars on which the system currently rests. Addressing the needs of these caregivers is therefore crucial for the survival of the system. This paper will present findings from a qualitative study that aimed to explore the experiences and needs of family caregivers who relatives were at various stages of recovery from mental illness. Participants for the study were members of carer support groups as well as non-member caregivers from various regions of Sydney, Australia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

“It’s us that have to deal with it seven days a week”: carers and borderline personality disorder

Carers provide unpaid support to family or friends with physical or mental health problems. This support may be within the domain of activities of daily living, such as personal care, or providing additional emotional support. While research has explored the carer experience within the National Health Service in the United Kingdom, it has not focused specifically on carers of individuals with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Eight carers for those with a diagnosis of BPD were invited to take part in two focus groups.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Correlates of stress in carers

BACKGROUND: Mental health services are required to take account of the needs of carers, yet little is known about how services affect carers.

AIMS: This paper explores the relationship between the user's mental health problems, the services received and the impact of caring on carers.

METHODS: Sixty-four carers were interviewed, measuring their experiences of care-giving, carer stress and the service user's level of impairment. A robust, composite measure of user severity was derived.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Carers' journeys

The material on this DVD reflects the views of a multi-ethnic group of carers and community members in Wolverhampton who meet regularly to share their experiences and hope for the future. Some issues for discussion are also suggested in the accompanying leaflet, including access to appropriate services, improving communication and better recognition of the role of carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Care management, dementia care and specialist mental health services: and evaluation

Objective: To evaluate a model of intensive case management for people with dementia based in a community-based mental health service for older people.

Method: Quasi-experimental design. Individuals in one community team setting received case management and were compared with those in a similar team without such a service. Fortythree matched pairs were identified. Eligible older people and their carers were interviewed at uptake and again at 6 and 12 months.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Sharing letters with patients and their carers: problems and outcomes in elderly and dementia care

In a cross-sectional survey, the authors assessed the attitudes of older patients and their carers towards receiving copies of letters about them and the effects upon outcomes of sharing letters. They also studied the opinions of consultants on letter-sharing. The results were few old age psychiatrists shared letters with patients or carers, and many had concerns about this practice. In contrast, letters were considered 'very welcome' by 87% of patients and carers who received them, and 81% of those who did not would be 'very pleased' to receive them.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

MyCare: the challenges facing young carers of parents with a severe mental illness

Adults with severe and enduring mental health problems are amongst the most marginalised and vulnerable people in our society. In providing care for these individuals, mental health professionals may potentially overlook the fact that many of these people are also parents: • There are an estimated 50,000 – 200,000 young people in the UK caring for a parent with mental health problems. • Many of these young people will provide help and support for a parent. • Some of these young people will be providing care beyond a level that is appropriate for their age. They will be ‘young carers’.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Carers of older adults' satisfaction with public mental health service clinicians: a qualitative study

Aims and objectives: The purpose of our paper was to explore primary caregivers' experience of the way public mental health nurses and other mental health clinicians responded to them as primary carers of older adults with mental illness.

Background: As populations age, the prevalence of mental illness in older adults will increase and the burden of care placed on family carers will intensify. While family carers are essential to the well-being and quality of life of older adults with mental illness, they frequently experience marginalisation from clinicians.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Mainstream in-patient mental health care for people with intellectual disabilities: service user, carer and provider experiences

Background  Government guidelines promote the use of mainstream mental health services for people with intellectual disabilities whenever possible. However, little is known about the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities who use such services.

Materials and Methods  Face-to-face interviews with service users, carers and community nurses were completed and analysed on a case by case basis using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The results were followed up in focus groups with service providers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

A new direction

NAViGO, a community interest company formed by service users and carers in partnership with mental health workers, has take over the running of all mental health services in northeast Lincolnshire. This article investigates this innovative example of service user and carer involvement in designing and delivering mental health services. The introduction of RESPECT training, which trains mental health workers to defuse difficult situations without using control and restraint techniques, is also discussed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11