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Neglect

Older adults neglected by their caregivers: vulnerabilities and risks identified in an adult protective services sample

Purpose Using a risk and vulnerability framework, the purpose of this paper is to describe the characteristics of older adults that Adult Protective Services (APS) substantiated for neglect by caregivers, their caregivers and the interrelationships between them. Design/methodology/approach The paper uses a qualitative study of 21 APS case record narratives using a template analysis. Findings Neglect related to withholding or refusing medical care was the most common. The older adults had multiple health conditions and geriatric syndromes.

Fri, 06/07/2019 - 15:05

Neglect by carers

There have been two widely reported criminal cases where informal carers, including family members, have been found guilty of the gross negligence manslaughter of the vulnerable person in their care. In this article, Richard Griffith considers the duty on informal carers when caring for a person and the duty on district nurses to protect vulnerable persons from harm. 

Tue, 10/16/2018 - 16:18

New light cast on extent of elder abuse

Partners appear to be the main perpetrators of neglect according to a new report that has triggered a government review of its No Secrets adult protection guidance. The author reports. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Few staff or carers prosecuted for abusing vulnerable adults, finds research

Concerns raised over number of prosecutions made against care staff or carers for ill-treatment or wilful neglect of people subject to the Mental Health Act or Mental Capacity Act. [Journal abstract]

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

A systematic review of interventions for elder abuse

The purpose of this study was to use rigorous systematic review methods to summarise the effectiveness of interventions for elder abuse. Only eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Evidence regarding the recurrence of abuse following intervention was limited, but the interventions for which this outcome was reported failed to reduce, and may even have increased, the likelihood of recurrence. Elder abuse interventions had no significant effect on case resolution and at-risk carer outcomes, and had mixed results regarding professional knowledge and behaviour related to elder abuse.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08