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The netherlands

Involvement, worries and loneliness of family caregivers of people with dementia during the COVID-19 visitor ban in long-term care facilities

Background: To prevent COVID-19 from spreading in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), the Dutch government took restrictive measures, including a visitor-ban in LTCFs. Objectives: This study examined the relationship between involvement of family caregivers (FCs) of people with dementia (PwD) living in LTCFs and FCs mental health during the visitor-ban, and whether this relationship was moderated by the frequency of alternative contact with PwD during the visitor-ban and FC resilience.

Sat, 09/03/2022 - 11:57

Feeling called to care: a qualitative interview study on normativity in family caregivers' experiences in Dutch home settings in a palliative care context

Background: Family caregivers, such as partners or other family members, are highly important to people who desire to stay at home in the last phase of their life-limiting disease. Despite the much-investigated challenges of family caregiving for a patient from one's direct social network, lots of caregivers persevere. Objectives: To better understand why, we aimed to specify how normative elements - i.e. what is considered good or valuable - shape family caregivers' experiences in Dutch home settings.

Fri, 09/02/2022 - 10:56

Sustainability of Long-term Care: Puzzling Tasks Ahead for Policy-Makers

Background: The sustainability of long-term care (LTC) is a prominent policy priority in many Western countries. LTC is one of the most pressing fiscal issues for the growing population of elderly people in the European Union (EU) Member States. Country recommendations regarding LTC are prominent under the EU’s European Semester.  Methods: This paper examines challenges related to the financial- and organizational sustainability of LTC systems in the EU.

Thu, 03/21/2019 - 14:54

Time-bound opportunity costs of informal care: Consequences for access to professional care, caregiver support, and labour supply estimates

The opportunity costs associated with the provision of informal care are usually estimated based on the reduced potential of the caregiver to partake in paid work (both in terms of whether they are able to undertake paid work, and if so the hours of work undertaken). In addition to the hours of informal care provided, these opportunity costs are also likely determined by the necessity to perform particular informal care tasks at specific moments of the day. The literature, to date, has largely overlooked this dimension of informal care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12