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Partnerships in nursing homes: How do family caregivers of residents with dementia perceive collaboration with staff?

Background: Partnerships between family and nursing staff in nursing homes are essential to address residents' needs and wishes. Collaboration is needed to create partnerships; nonetheless, challenges exist. Aim: This study aimed to gain insights into the experiences of families collaborating with staff. Method: Semi-structured interviews were held with 30 family caregivers of nursing home residents with dementia.

Fri, 06/10/2022 - 12:16

Family involvement in the Namaste care family program for dementia: A qualitative study on experiences of family, nursing home staff, and volunteers

Background: Family caregivers may experience difficulty maintaining meaningful contact with a relative with advanced dementia. Nevertheless, some family caregivers prefer to remain involved in the care of their relative after admission to a nursing home. Family involvement in the care is important but little is known about how this works in practice and what exactly is needed to improve it.

Mon, 05/30/2022 - 13:13

Patient and Caregiver Perceptions of Nursing Home Physicians: Insight from Yelp Reviews, 2009–2018

OBJECTIVES To describe the content of reviews submitted on Yelp that pertain to nursing home (NH) physicians. DESIGN Retrospective qualitative study. SETTING NHs in the United States reviewed on Yelp from 2009 to 2018 with reviews that discussed NH physicians. PARTICIPANTS Physicians in 375 NHs in 31 states. MEASUREMENTS Content analysis was performed to detect recurrent themes and divergent ideas about NH physicians perceived by reviewers. RESULTS: Average rating among NHs with physician reviews was 2.0 (standard deviation = 1.5; range = 1–5).

Sat, 12/12/2020 - 14:09

Comparing Symptom Ratings by Staff and Family Carers in Residents Dying in Long-Term Care Facilities in Three European Countries, Results From a PACE Survey

Context Symptom management is essential in the end-of-life care of long-term care facility residents. Objectives To study discrepancies and possible associated factors in staff and family carers' symptom assessment scores for residents in the last week of life. Methods A postmortem survey in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Finland: staff and family carers completed the End-of-Life in Dementia-Comfort Assessment in Dying scale, rating 14 symptoms on a one-point to three-point scale. Higher scores reflect better comfort.

Tue, 11/24/2020 - 19:45

Separation characterized by responsibility and guilt: Family caregivers’ experiences with palliative care for a close family member with severe dementia in long-term care facilities

Aim and objectives: The aim of this study was to explore family caregivers’ experiences with palliative care for a close family member with severe dementia in long-term care facilities. Background: Dementia not only affects individuals but also affects and changes the lives of close family members. An increasing number of dementia-related deaths occur in long-term care facilities; therefore, it is critical to understand how healthcare professionals support and care for residents with dementia and their families at the end of life.

Wed, 02/26/2020 - 12:47

What do relatives value most in end-of-lie care for people with dementia?

Background: End-of-life care for older people with dementia is often sub-optimal. Understanding the experiences of the relatives involved in the care of the person with dementia may help to improve care practice. Aims: To investigate relatives' experiences with end-of-life care for people with dementia, comparing the nursing home and home setting. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 32 individuals who were bereaved of someone with dementia. Thematic analysis was performed to identify main themes from the data.

Thu, 12/12/2019 - 11:14

Effects of long‐term care setting on spousal health outcomes

Objective To provide empirical evidence on the effects of home and community‐based services (HCBS) (vs nursing home) use on spousal health. Data Sources Merged data from the 1996 to 2012 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the Area Health Resource File (AHRF). Study Design We assess the impact of HCBS use on spousal health. We use an instrumental variable (IV) approach to account for the potential endogeneity of the choice of care setting and reverse causality.

Mon, 09/09/2019 - 13:28

Patterns of carer distress over time in mild dementia

Objective To study the level of carer reported distress in mild dementia, over a 3‐year period. Methods This study is part of the Norwegian DemVest‐study and utilises data from carers of people with mild dementia (n = 223). Those diagnosed with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, n = 63) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 97) were included together with other dementia types (n = 63). The Relatives' Stress Scale was used to assess the level of reported distress in carers.

Fri, 04/05/2019 - 11:20

Interventions to support people with dementia and their caregivers during the transition from home care to nursing home care: A systematic review

Background During the transition of people with dementia from home to nursing home family caregivers often feel burdened. ObjectivesWe aimed to 1) identify interventions which support people with dementia and their caregivers in the transition from home care to nursing home care, 2) synthesize the evidence for efficacy of these interventions, and 3) examine whether the identified interventions have been systematically developed, evaluated and implemented according to the Medical Research Council guidance on complex interventions.

Thu, 03/21/2019 - 15:01

To be or not to be? A caregiver's question: the lived experience of a stroke family during the first 18 months poststroke

Background: Disability following a stroke often requires family, commonly a spouse, to provide care enabling the stroke survivor to return home. Immediate or extended family and friends may help provide direct care or support the primary caregiver. While family members share the common stroke experience, this is lived within the context of separate lives. Research examining the individual nuances, roles and contribution of family and/or friends forming part of collective stroke networks, has largely been overlooked.

Fri, 11/16/2018 - 11:16